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Title: Analytic study to evaluate associations between hazardous waste sites and birth defects. Final report

Abstract

A study was conducted to evaluate the risk of two types of birth defects (central nervous system and musculoskeletal defects) associated with mothers` exposure to solvents, metals, and pesticides through residence near hazardous waste sites. The only environmental factor showing a statistically significant elevation in risk was living within one mile of industrial or commercial facilities emitting solvents into the air. Residence near these facilities showed elevated risk for central nervous system defects but no elevated risks for musculoskeletal defects.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
107985
Report Number(s):
PB-95-199196/XAB
CNN: Grant ATSDR-H75/ATH290110012; TRN: 52612644
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; RISK ASSESSMENT; PUBLIC HEALTH; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; STATISTICAL DATA; SOLVENTS; HEALTH HAZARDS

Citation Formats

Marshall, E.G., Gensburg, L.J., Geary, N.S., Deres, D.A., and Cayo, M.R. Analytic study to evaluate associations between hazardous waste sites and birth defects. Final report. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Marshall, E.G., Gensburg, L.J., Geary, N.S., Deres, D.A., & Cayo, M.R. Analytic study to evaluate associations between hazardous waste sites and birth defects. Final report. United States.
Marshall, E.G., Gensburg, L.J., Geary, N.S., Deres, D.A., and Cayo, M.R. 1995. "Analytic study to evaluate associations between hazardous waste sites and birth defects. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_107985,
title = {Analytic study to evaluate associations between hazardous waste sites and birth defects. Final report},
author = {Marshall, E.G. and Gensburg, L.J. and Geary, N.S. and Deres, D.A. and Cayo, M.R.},
abstractNote = {A study was conducted to evaluate the risk of two types of birth defects (central nervous system and musculoskeletal defects) associated with mothers` exposure to solvents, metals, and pesticides through residence near hazardous waste sites. The only environmental factor showing a statistically significant elevation in risk was living within one mile of industrial or commercial facilities emitting solvents into the air. Residence near these facilities showed elevated risk for central nervous system defects but no elevated risks for musculoskeletal defects.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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