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Title: Paleoenvironmental changes in the Western Great Lakes National Parks since deglaciation: Implications for the effect of the Great Lakes on regional climate

Abstract

Pollen and charcoal analyses of lake and bog core sediments from Voyageur`s National Park and the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore provide evidence of regional Holocene climate changes for the western Great Lakes that differ from paleoclimates interpreted for regions of the Midwest more distant from the Great Lakes. The timing of the middle Holocene dry period when prairie and oak-savannah expanded in the Midwest occurs between 9000 and 5000 yr B. P. in the northern regions, but between 5600 and 3500 yr B.P. in the lower tier of the northern midwestern states away from the lakes.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
107154
Report Number(s):
CONF-9507129-
Journal ID: BECLAG; ISSN 0012-9623; TRN: 95:006512-0070
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 3; Conference: 80. anniversary of the transdisciplinary nature of ecology, Snowbird, UT (United States), 30 Jul - 3 Aug 1995; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GREAT LAKES; PALEOCLIMATOLOGY; CLIMATIC CHANGE; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS

Citation Formats

Winkler, M.G. Paleoenvironmental changes in the Western Great Lakes National Parks since deglaciation: Implications for the effect of the Great Lakes on regional climate. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Winkler, M.G. Paleoenvironmental changes in the Western Great Lakes National Parks since deglaciation: Implications for the effect of the Great Lakes on regional climate. United States.
Winkler, M.G. Fri . "Paleoenvironmental changes in the Western Great Lakes National Parks since deglaciation: Implications for the effect of the Great Lakes on regional climate". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_107154,
title = {Paleoenvironmental changes in the Western Great Lakes National Parks since deglaciation: Implications for the effect of the Great Lakes on regional climate},
author = {Winkler, M.G.},
abstractNote = {Pollen and charcoal analyses of lake and bog core sediments from Voyageur`s National Park and the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore provide evidence of regional Holocene climate changes for the western Great Lakes that differ from paleoclimates interpreted for regions of the Midwest more distant from the Great Lakes. The timing of the middle Holocene dry period when prairie and oak-savannah expanded in the Midwest occurs between 9000 and 5000 yr B. P. in the northern regions, but between 5600 and 3500 yr B.P. in the lower tier of the northern midwestern states away from the lakes.},
doi = {},
journal = {Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America},
number = 3,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}
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