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Title: Implications of a 130 GeV Gamma-Ray Line for Dark Matter

Abstract

Recent reports of a gamma-ray line feature at -130 GeV in data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope have generated a great deal of interest in models in which dark matter particles annihilate with a sizable cross section to final states including photons. In this paper, we take a model-independent approach and discuss a number of possibilities for dark matter candidates which could potentially generate such a feature. While we identify several scenarios which could lead to such a gamma-ray line, these models are each fairly constrained. In particular, viable models require large couplings (g{>=}1-3) and additional charged particles with masses in the range of approximately -130-200 GeV. Furthermore, lower energy gamma-ray constraints from the Galactic center force us to consider scenarios in which the dark matter annihilates in the early Universe through velocity-suppressed processes or to final states which yield relatively few gamma-rays (such as e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, or v{bar v}). An exception to these conclusions can be found in models in which the dark matter annihilates to heavy intermediate states which decay to photons to generate a linelike gamma-ray spectrum.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1049401
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-12-259-A
Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998; arXiv eprint number arXiv:1205.6811; TRN: US1204824
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review. D, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 86; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; 79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANNIHILATION; CHARGED PARTICLES; COUPLINGS; CROSS SECTIONS; DATA; DECAY; GAMMA ASTRONOMY; INTERMEDIATE STATE; GEV RANGE; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PARTICLES; PHOTONS; SPACE; TELESCOPES; UNIVERSE; Astrophysics, Phenomenology-HEP

Citation Formats

Buckley, Matthew R, /Fermilab, Hooper, Dan, and /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. Implications of a 130 GeV Gamma-Ray Line for Dark Matter. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.86.043524.
Buckley, Matthew R, /Fermilab, Hooper, Dan, & /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. Implications of a 130 GeV Gamma-Ray Line for Dark Matter. United States. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.043524
Buckley, Matthew R, /Fermilab, Hooper, Dan, and /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. Tue . "Implications of a 130 GeV Gamma-Ray Line for Dark Matter". United States. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.043524.
@article{osti_1049401,
title = {Implications of a 130 GeV Gamma-Ray Line for Dark Matter},
author = {Buckley, Matthew R and /Fermilab and Hooper, Dan and /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.},
abstractNote = {Recent reports of a gamma-ray line feature at -130 GeV in data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope have generated a great deal of interest in models in which dark matter particles annihilate with a sizable cross section to final states including photons. In this paper, we take a model-independent approach and discuss a number of possibilities for dark matter candidates which could potentially generate such a feature. While we identify several scenarios which could lead to such a gamma-ray line, these models are each fairly constrained. In particular, viable models require large couplings (g{>=}1-3) and additional charged particles with masses in the range of approximately -130-200 GeV. Furthermore, lower energy gamma-ray constraints from the Galactic center force us to consider scenarios in which the dark matter annihilates in the early Universe through velocity-suppressed processes or to final states which yield relatively few gamma-rays (such as e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, or v{bar v}). An exception to these conclusions can be found in models in which the dark matter annihilates to heavy intermediate states which decay to photons to generate a linelike gamma-ray spectrum.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.86.043524},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1049401}, journal = {Physical Review. D, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
issn = {1550-7998},
number = ,
volume = 86,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {5}
}