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Title: Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman

Abstract

Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Pat Thiel talks about her friend and colleague Dan Shechtman who received the 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1047589
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; Thiel; AmesLaboratory; DOE; Pat; Dan; Shechtman; Nobel; Prize

Citation Formats

Thiel, Pat. Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Thiel, Pat. Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman. United States.
Thiel, Pat. 2012. "Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1047589.
@article{osti_1047589,
title = {Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman},
author = {Thiel, Pat},
abstractNote = {Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Pat Thiel talks about her friend and colleague Dan Shechtman who received the 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 1
}
  • Pat Thiel, Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, was invited to be a guest at the ceremony on December 10th, in Stockholm, Sweden, where Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory scientist, received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Following her return to the Lab, Thiel shared some of her recollections of the momentous event.
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