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Title: Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America

Abstract

Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1044154
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-10-08279; LA-UR-10-8279
TRN: US201214%%347
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: PACIFICHEM 2010 ; December 16, 2010 ; Honolulu, HI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; ACCIDENTS; ARCTIC REGIONS; ATOMS; BIOSPHERE; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; FALLOUT DEPOSITS; GLOBAL FALLOUT; MIXTURES; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PLUTONIUM 239; PLUTONIUM 240; PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES; SAMPLING; TESTING; USA; WEAPONS

Citation Formats

Steiner, Robert E, La Mont, Stephen P, Eisele, William F, Fresquez, Philip R, Mc Naughton, Michael, and Whicker, Jeffrey J. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Steiner, Robert E, La Mont, Stephen P, Eisele, William F, Fresquez, Philip R, Mc Naughton, Michael, & Whicker, Jeffrey J. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America. United States.
Steiner, Robert E, La Mont, Stephen P, Eisele, William F, Fresquez, Philip R, Mc Naughton, Michael, and Whicker, Jeffrey J. 2010. "Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1044154.
@article{osti_1044154,
title = {Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America},
author = {Steiner, Robert E and La Mont, Stephen P and Eisele, William F and Fresquez, Philip R and Mc Naughton, Michael and Whicker, Jeffrey J},
abstractNote = {Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month =
}

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