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Title: Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

Abstract

Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential formore » catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the identity of the rate-limiting steps.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY (BNL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE SC OFFICE OF SCIENCE (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1041938
Report Number(s):
BNL-97616-2012-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0006-2960; BICHAW; TRN: US201212%%349
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemistry (Eaton); Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADENINES; AMMONIA; CATALYSIS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; DEAMINATION; ELECTRON SPIN RESONANCE; ENZYMES; ESCHERICHIA COLI; FERRICYANIDES; HYPOXANTHINE; INACTIVATION; INDUCTION; IRON; ISOTOPE EFFECTS; MOESSBAUER EFFECT; MUTAGENESIS; RESIDUES; RESOLUTION; SOLVENTS; SPIN; VISCOSITY

Citation Formats

S Kamat, A Bagaria, D Kumaran, G Holmes-Hampton, H Fan, A Sali, J Sauder, S Burley, P Lindahl, and et. al. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1021/bi101788n.
S Kamat, A Bagaria, D Kumaran, G Holmes-Hampton, H Fan, A Sali, J Sauder, S Burley, P Lindahl, & et. al. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase. United States. doi:10.1021/bi101788n.
S Kamat, A Bagaria, D Kumaran, G Holmes-Hampton, H Fan, A Sali, J Sauder, S Burley, P Lindahl, and et. al. Sat . "Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase". United States. doi:10.1021/bi101788n.
@article{osti_1041938,
title = {Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase},
author = {S Kamat and A Bagaria and D Kumaran and G Holmes-Hampton and H Fan and A Sali and J Sauder and S Burley and P Lindahl and et. al.},
abstractNote = {Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the identity of the rate-limiting steps.},
doi = {10.1021/bi101788n},
journal = {Biochemistry (Eaton)},
number = 11,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2011},
month = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2011}
}
  • Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. Themore » apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the identity of the rate-limiting steps.« less
  • Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 ordersmore » of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The sirtuin SIRT1 is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, a Sir2 family member, and one of seven human sirtuins. Sirtuins are conserved from archaea to mammals and regulate transcription, genome stability, longevity, and metabolism. SIRT1 regulates transcription via deacetylation of transcription factors such as PPARγ, NFκB, and the tumor suppressor protein p53. EX527 (27) is a nanomolar SIRT1 inhibitor and a micromolar SIRT2 inhibitor. To elucidate the mechanism of SIRT inhibition by 27, we determined the 2.5 Å crystal structure of the SIRT1 catalytic domain (residues 241–516) bound to NAD+ and the 27 analogue compound 35. 35 binds deep in themore » catalytic cleft, displacing the NAD+ nicotinamide and forcing the cofactor into an extended conformation. The extended NAD+ conformation sterically prevents substrate binding. The SIRT1/NAD+/35 crystal structure defines a novel mechanism of histone deacetylase inhibition and provides a basis for understanding, and rationally improving, inhibition of this therapeutically important target by drug-like molecules.« less
  • Logistic regression and artificial neural networks have been developed as two non-linear models to establish quantitative structure-activity relationships between structural descriptors and biochemical activity of adenosine based competitive inhibitors, toward adenosine deaminase. The training set included 24 compounds with known k {sub i} values. The models were trained to solve two-class problems. Unlike the previous work in which multiple linear regression was used, the highest of positive charge on the molecules was recognized to be in close relation with their inhibition activity, while the electric charge on atom N1 of adenosine was found to be a poor descriptor. Consequently, themore » previously developed equation was improved and the newly formed one could predict the class of 91.66% of compounds correctly. Also optimized 2-3-1 and 3-4-1 neural networks could increase this rate to 95.83%.« less