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Title: TVA exceeds CAAA NO{sub x} requirements

Abstract

This article describes how a utility reduced NO{sub x} and improved boiler performance using sequential process optimization software. Many utilities are endeavoring now to reduce NO{sub x} emissions as they look with apprehension toward January 1, 2000, the effective date for Phase 2 of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). At the Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Johnsonville Fossil Plant, plant managers wanted to update their 1950`s-vintage coal-fired units with low-NO{sub x} burners to comply with the Phase 2 NO{sub x} limitations. With limited capital available to replace existing burners, managers realized that nay low-NO{sub x} solution should not only be effective for minimizing NO{sub x} emissions, but should also offer opportunities for improved thermal performance leading to cost savings and a rapid return on investment. Guided by these objectives, the field services group of the TVA`s clean air project investigated several options to reduce emissions at the lowest cost. The group decided to use a new technology, co-developed by the Electric Power Research Institute and Ultramax Corp., called sequential process optimization. Application of sequential process optimization makes possible immediate reductions in NO{sub x} while maintaining heat rate and causing no adverse effect on other thermal or emissions parameters.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];
  1. United Energy Services Corp., Marietta, GA (United States)
  2. Ultramax Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
103660
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power Engineering (Barrington); Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: PBD: Aug 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; NITROGEN OXIDES; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; BOILERS; PERFORMANCE; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS

Citation Formats

Boyle, R.J., Patterson, P.D., and Pech, J.W. TVA exceeds CAAA NO{sub x} requirements. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Boyle, R.J., Patterson, P.D., & Pech, J.W. TVA exceeds CAAA NO{sub x} requirements. United States.
Boyle, R.J., Patterson, P.D., and Pech, J.W. Tue . "TVA exceeds CAAA NO{sub x} requirements". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_103660,
title = {TVA exceeds CAAA NO{sub x} requirements},
author = {Boyle, R.J. and Patterson, P.D. and Pech, J.W.},
abstractNote = {This article describes how a utility reduced NO{sub x} and improved boiler performance using sequential process optimization software. Many utilities are endeavoring now to reduce NO{sub x} emissions as they look with apprehension toward January 1, 2000, the effective date for Phase 2 of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). At the Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Johnsonville Fossil Plant, plant managers wanted to update their 1950`s-vintage coal-fired units with low-NO{sub x} burners to comply with the Phase 2 NO{sub x} limitations. With limited capital available to replace existing burners, managers realized that nay low-NO{sub x} solution should not only be effective for minimizing NO{sub x} emissions, but should also offer opportunities for improved thermal performance leading to cost savings and a rapid return on investment. Guided by these objectives, the field services group of the TVA`s clean air project investigated several options to reduce emissions at the lowest cost. The group decided to use a new technology, co-developed by the Electric Power Research Institute and Ultramax Corp., called sequential process optimization. Application of sequential process optimization makes possible immediate reductions in NO{sub x} while maintaining heat rate and causing no adverse effect on other thermal or emissions parameters.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power Engineering (Barrington)},
number = 8,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}
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