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Title: Climatological data for clouds over the globe from surface observations, 1982--1991: The total cloud edition

Abstract

Routine, surface synoptic weather reports from ships and land stations over the entire globe, for the ten-year period December 1981 through November 1991, were processed for total cloud cover and the frequencies of occurrence of clear sky, precipitation, and sky-obscured due to fog. Archived data, consisting of various annual, seasonal and monthly averages, are provided in grid boxes that are typically 2.5{degrees} {times} 2.5{degrees} for land and 5{degrees} {times} 5{degrees} for ocean. Day and nighttime averages are also given separately for each season. Several derived quantities, such as interannual variations and annual and diurnal harmonics, are provided as well. This data set incorporates an improved representation of nighttime cloudiness by utilizing only those nighttime observations for which the illuminance due to moonlight exceeds a specified threshold. This reduction in the night-detection bias increases the computed global average total cloud cover by about 2%. The impact on computed diurnal cycles is even greater, particularly over the oceans where is found, in contrast to previous surface-based climatologies, that cloudiness is often greater at night than during the day.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences
  2. Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences
  3. Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10193602
Report Number(s):
ORNL/CDIAC-72; NDP-026A
ON: DE95002537; CNN: Grant NAG-1-998; Contract 144806-A-Q1
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: ESD Publication No. 4348; PBD: Oct 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CLOUD COVER; ANNUAL VARIATIONS; DAILY VARIATIONS; DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEMS; METEOROLOGY; ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION; 540110; BASIC STUDIES

Citation Formats

Hahn, C J, Warren, S G, and London, J. Climatological data for clouds over the globe from surface observations, 1982--1991: The total cloud edition. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/10193602.
Hahn, C J, Warren, S G, & London, J. Climatological data for clouds over the globe from surface observations, 1982--1991: The total cloud edition. United States. doi:10.2172/10193602.
Hahn, C J, Warren, S G, and London, J. Sat . "Climatological data for clouds over the globe from surface observations, 1982--1991: The total cloud edition". United States. doi:10.2172/10193602. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10193602.
@article{osti_10193602,
title = {Climatological data for clouds over the globe from surface observations, 1982--1991: The total cloud edition},
author = {Hahn, C J and Warren, S G and London, J},
abstractNote = {Routine, surface synoptic weather reports from ships and land stations over the entire globe, for the ten-year period December 1981 through November 1991, were processed for total cloud cover and the frequencies of occurrence of clear sky, precipitation, and sky-obscured due to fog. Archived data, consisting of various annual, seasonal and monthly averages, are provided in grid boxes that are typically 2.5{degrees} {times} 2.5{degrees} for land and 5{degrees} {times} 5{degrees} for ocean. Day and nighttime averages are also given separately for each season. Several derived quantities, such as interannual variations and annual and diurnal harmonics, are provided as well. This data set incorporates an improved representation of nighttime cloudiness by utilizing only those nighttime observations for which the illuminance due to moonlight exceeds a specified threshold. This reduction in the night-detection bias increases the computed global average total cloud cover by about 2%. The impact on computed diurnal cycles is even greater, particularly over the oceans where is found, in contrast to previous surface-based climatologies, that cloudiness is often greater at night than during the day.},
doi = {10.2172/10193602},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {10}
}