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Title: The effects of finite element grid density on model correlation and damage detection of a bridge

Abstract

Variation of model size as determined by grid density is studied for both model refinement and damage detection. In model refinement 3 it is found that a large model with a fine grid is preferable in order to achieve a reasonable correlation between the experimental response and the finite element model. A smaller model falls victim to the inaccuracies of the finite element method. As the grid become increasing finer, the FE method approaches an accurate representation. In damage detection the FE method is only a starting point. The model is refined with a matrix method which doesn`t retain the FE approximation, therefore a smaller model that captures most of the dynamics of the structure can be used and is preferable.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10182780
Report Number(s):
SAND-94-2082C; CONF-950444-1
ON: DE94018895; BR: GB0103012
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 36. adaptive structural dynamics and materials conference,New Orleans, LA (United States),10-14 Apr 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; BRIDGES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; DAMAGE; DYNAMICS; DEGREES OF FREEDOM; 420200; 990200; FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND TECHNIQUES; MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTERS

Citation Formats

Simmermacher, T., Mayes, R.L., Reese, G.M., James, G.H., and Zimmerman, D.C.. The effects of finite element grid density on model correlation and damage detection of a bridge. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Simmermacher, T., Mayes, R.L., Reese, G.M., James, G.H., & Zimmerman, D.C.. The effects of finite element grid density on model correlation and damage detection of a bridge. United States.
Simmermacher, T., Mayes, R.L., Reese, G.M., James, G.H., and Zimmerman, D.C.. Sun . "The effects of finite element grid density on model correlation and damage detection of a bridge". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10182780.
@article{osti_10182780,
title = {The effects of finite element grid density on model correlation and damage detection of a bridge},
author = {Simmermacher, T. and Mayes, R.L. and Reese, G.M. and James, G.H. and Zimmerman, D.C.},
abstractNote = {Variation of model size as determined by grid density is studied for both model refinement and damage detection. In model refinement 3 it is found that a large model with a fine grid is preferable in order to achieve a reasonable correlation between the experimental response and the finite element model. A smaller model falls victim to the inaccuracies of the finite element method. As the grid become increasing finer, the FE method approaches an accurate representation. In damage detection the FE method is only a starting point. The model is refined with a matrix method which doesn`t retain the FE approximation, therefore a smaller model that captures most of the dynamics of the structure can be used and is preferable.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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