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Title: Compiled reports on the applicability of selected codes and standards to advanced reactors

Abstract

The following papers were prepared for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under contract DE-AC06-76RLO-1830 NRC FIN L2207. This project, Applicability of Codes and Standards to Advance Reactors, reviewed selected mechanical and electrical codes and standards to determine their applicability to the construction, qualification, and testing of advanced reactors and to develop recommendations as to where it might be useful and practical to revise them to suit the (design certification) needs of the NRC.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10181628
Report Number(s):
PNL-10089
ON: DE94018677; TRN: 94:008150
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Aug 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; SPECIFICATIONS; STANDARDS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; 210100; 210200; 220200; POWER REACTORS, NONBREEDING, LIGHT-WATER MODERATED, BOILING WATER COOLED; POWER REACTORS, NONBREEDING, LIGHT-WATER MODERATED, NONBOILING WATER COOLED; COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES

Citation Formats

Benjamin, E.L., Hoopingarner, K.R., Markowski, F.J., Mitts, T.M., Nickolaus, J.R., and Vo, T.V. Compiled reports on the applicability of selected codes and standards to advanced reactors. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/10181628.
Benjamin, E.L., Hoopingarner, K.R., Markowski, F.J., Mitts, T.M., Nickolaus, J.R., & Vo, T.V. Compiled reports on the applicability of selected codes and standards to advanced reactors. United States. doi:10.2172/10181628.
Benjamin, E.L., Hoopingarner, K.R., Markowski, F.J., Mitts, T.M., Nickolaus, J.R., and Vo, T.V. 1994. "Compiled reports on the applicability of selected codes and standards to advanced reactors". United States. doi:10.2172/10181628. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10181628.
@article{osti_10181628,
title = {Compiled reports on the applicability of selected codes and standards to advanced reactors},
author = {Benjamin, E.L. and Hoopingarner, K.R. and Markowski, F.J. and Mitts, T.M. and Nickolaus, J.R. and Vo, T.V.},
abstractNote = {The following papers were prepared for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under contract DE-AC06-76RLO-1830 NRC FIN L2207. This project, Applicability of Codes and Standards to Advance Reactors, reviewed selected mechanical and electrical codes and standards to determine their applicability to the construction, qualification, and testing of advanced reactors and to develop recommendations as to where it might be useful and practical to revise them to suit the (design certification) needs of the NRC.},
doi = {10.2172/10181628},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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