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Title: Thermal performance of fiberglass and cellulose attic insulations

Abstract

A series of experiments has been completed on the thermal performance of fiberglass and cellulose attic insulations under winter conditions using an attic test module in a guarded hot box facility. Experiments with one type of loose-fill fiberglass insulation showed that the thermal resistance at large temperature differences (70 to 76{degrees}F) was about 35 to 50% less than at small temperature differences. The additional heat flow, attributed to natural convection, was effectively eliminated by applying a covering of fiberglass batts or a combination of a polyethylene film and fiberglass blankets. No significant convection was found either with fiberglass batts or with one type of loose-fill cellulose. Using the experimental data along with an attic model, the additional energy costs due to convection in the coldest climate investigated were estimated to be $$0.025/ft{sup 2}yr to $$0.028/ft{sup 2}yr at the R-19 level and $$0.014/ft{sup 2}yr at the R-38 level. For the same conditions, annual energy savings due to upgrading insulation from the R-19 to the R-38 level were estimated to be $$0.046/ft{sup 2}yr to $0.070/ft{sup 2}yr.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10177817
Report Number(s):
CONF-921203-3
ON: DE92040714
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Thermal performance of the exterior envelopes of buildings,Clearwater, FL (United States),7-10 Dec 1992; Other Information: PBD: [1992]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FIBERGLASS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; ATTICS; THERMAL INSULATION; THERMAL ANALYSIS; AIR FLOW; CEILINGS; ECONOMICS; HEAT TRANSFER; COST ESTIMATION; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENERGY CONSERVATION; NATURAL CONVECTION; 320107; 360606; BUILDING SYSTEMS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Wilkes, K E, and Childs, P W. Thermal performance of fiberglass and cellulose attic insulations. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Wilkes, K E, & Childs, P W. Thermal performance of fiberglass and cellulose attic insulations. United States.
Wilkes, K E, and Childs, P W. 1992. "Thermal performance of fiberglass and cellulose attic insulations". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10177817.
@article{osti_10177817,
title = {Thermal performance of fiberglass and cellulose attic insulations},
author = {Wilkes, K E and Childs, P W},
abstractNote = {A series of experiments has been completed on the thermal performance of fiberglass and cellulose attic insulations under winter conditions using an attic test module in a guarded hot box facility. Experiments with one type of loose-fill fiberglass insulation showed that the thermal resistance at large temperature differences (70 to 76{degrees}F) was about 35 to 50% less than at small temperature differences. The additional heat flow, attributed to natural convection, was effectively eliminated by applying a covering of fiberglass batts or a combination of a polyethylene film and fiberglass blankets. No significant convection was found either with fiberglass batts or with one type of loose-fill cellulose. Using the experimental data along with an attic model, the additional energy costs due to convection in the coldest climate investigated were estimated to be $0.025/ft{sup 2}yr to $0.028/ft{sup 2}yr at the R-19 level and $0.014/ft{sup 2}yr at the R-38 level. For the same conditions, annual energy savings due to upgrading insulation from the R-19 to the R-38 level were estimated to be $0.046/ft{sup 2}yr to $0.070/ft{sup 2}yr.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/10177817}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1992},
month = {10}
}

Conference:
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