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Title: Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993

Abstract

The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10169413
Report Number(s):
DOE/EIA-0191(93)
ON: DE94015595; NC: NONE; TRN: AHC29416%%158
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jul 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; ENERGY EXPENSES; STATISTICAL DATA; QUALITY CONTROL; DECISION MAKING; 296000; 294000; ELECTRIC POWER; FOSSIL FUELS

Citation Formats

Not Available. Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/10169413.
Not Available. Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993. United States. doi:10.2172/10169413.
Not Available. 1994. "Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993". United States. doi:10.2172/10169413. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10169413.
@article{osti_10169413,
title = {Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.},
doi = {10.2172/10169413},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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  • The cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants is prepared by the Electric Power Division Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration; Department of Energy. The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants is designed to provide information about the cost and quality of fossil fuels at electric generating units in the 48 contiguous States and the District of Columbia. It is also intended to provide information in a concise format to satisfy the needs of a wide variety of audiences. The publication is geared to a variety of applications by electricmore » utilities, industry, consumers, educational institutions and government in recognition of the growing importance of energy planning in contemporary society. This report contains monthly fuel cost, quality, and quantity data aggregated at the State and regional level beginning with Table 6, while 12-month tables are presented only at the regional level. Table 33 contains this information at the plant level, grouped by State and geographic region. This grouping allows quick comparisons of received fuel costs of plants and utilities in the same State and geographic region. In addition to steam-electric unit information, this report contains information on fuels received at peaking units: combustion turbines, internal combustion (diesel) engines, and combined-cycle units. Only fossil-fueled plants with a combined capacity of 25 megawatts or greater are covered in this report. 33 tables.« less
  • Subject data are summarized for fossil fuels delivered to electric utility plants in the US (the 50 states and the District of Columbia) with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Plant-by-plant data are grouped on a state and regional basis to compare prices of similar fuels delivered to other plants in the same state and region. In 1979, the production of electric energy rose 1.8%, reaching a new record of 2,247 billion kWh. The biggest increase in electric generation occurred in coal plants which produced 1,076 billion kWh, or 47.9% of the total. Coal generation increased 10.1% frommore » the 1978 level. The second largest increase in electric generation came from gas units, increasing to a level of 330 billion kWh, an increase of 8.2% from 1978. Coal and gas generation made up for the 17% decrease in oil generation and the 7.6% decrease in nuclear generation, as some nuclear plants, such as Three Mile Island and Surry, stopped generation during the year. Oil generation decreased 16.8% from last year, mainly due to the high price of residual oil.« less
  • Tabulated data are presented on coal, fuel oil, and gas consumption at US steam-electric power plants and at peaking power plants. The information is tabulated by month of the year, geographic region, state, and type of fuel. Additional data are supplied on the quantity, cost, and average percent of sulfur for fuels used by named utilities in each state. (LCL)
  • Information on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts in 1984 to electric utility plants is presented, with some data provided for each year from 1979 through 1984. Data were collected on Forms FERC-423 and EIA-759. Fuels are coal, fuel oil, and natural gas. Data are reported by company and plant, by type of plant, and by State and Census Region, with US totals. This report contains information on fossil fuel receipts to electric utility plants with a combined steam capacity of 50 megawatts or larger. Previous reports contained data on all electric plants with a combined capacity ofmore » 25 megawatts or larger. All historical data in this publication have been revised to reflect the new reporting threshold. Peaking unit data are no longer collected. A glossary of terms, technical notes, and references are also provided. 7 figs., 62 tabs.« less
  • Electric utilities received 666.7 million short tons of coal in 1985, a decrease of 17.4 million short tons from the record 684.1 million short tons received in 1984. This 2.5% decrease in coal receipts resulted from the decision by many utilities to reduce the record stockpiles created in anticipation of a possible United Mine Workers strike in September of 1984. Petroleum receipts at electric utilities continued to decrease as they have over the past several years. Receipts totaled 164.9 million barrels, down 37.4 million barrels in 1985 from 1984 receipts. Coal and nuclear power continue to displace petroleum as themore » primary fuel consumed by electric utilities. Receipts of gas were 2,860.6 billion cubic feet (Bcf), down 77.2 Bcf from 1984 receipts.« less