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Title: Nanoscale structure of the magnetic induction at monopole defects in artificial spin-ice lattices.

Abstract

Artificially frustrated spin-ice systems are of considerable interest since they simulate the spin frustration and concomitant rich behavior exhibited by atoms on a crystal lattice in naturally occurring spin-ice systems such as pyrochlores. As a result of the magnetic frustration, these systems can exhibit 'magnetic monopole' type defects, which are an example of an exotic emergent quasiparticle. The local magnetization structure of such monopole defects determines their stability and thus is critical to understanding their behavior. In this paper, we report on the direct observation at room temperature of the nanoscale magnetic structure of individual magnetic monopoles in an artificially frustrated two-dimensional square spin-ice lattice, using high-resolution aberration-corrected Lorentz transmission electron microscopy. By combining the high-resolution microscopy with micromagnetic simulation, we demonstrate how nucleation of defect strings, reminiscent of Dirac strings, connecting monopole defects controls the demagnetization process in these spin-ice lattices.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Center for Nanoscale Materials
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1015949
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/JA-69348
Journal ID: 1098-0121; TRN: US201112%%83
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Phys. Rev. B
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 17 ; May 18, 2011
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATOMS; CRYSTAL LATTICES; DEFECTS; DEMAGNETIZATION; INDUCTION; MAGNETIC MONOPOLES; MAGNETIZATION; MICROSCOPY; MONOPOLES; NUCLEATION; SIMULATION; SPIN; STABILITY; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Phatak, C, Petford-Long, A K, Tanase, M, Heinonen, O., De Graef, M, MSD), Carnegie Mellon Univ.), Northwestern Univ.), and NIST). Nanoscale structure of the magnetic induction at monopole defects in artificial spin-ice lattices.. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.83.174431.
Phatak, C, Petford-Long, A K, Tanase, M, Heinonen, O., De Graef, M, MSD), Carnegie Mellon Univ.), Northwestern Univ.), & NIST). Nanoscale structure of the magnetic induction at monopole defects in artificial spin-ice lattices.. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.83.174431.
Phatak, C, Petford-Long, A K, Tanase, M, Heinonen, O., De Graef, M, MSD), Carnegie Mellon Univ.), Northwestern Univ.), and NIST). Wed . "Nanoscale structure of the magnetic induction at monopole defects in artificial spin-ice lattices.". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.83.174431.
@article{osti_1015949,
title = {Nanoscale structure of the magnetic induction at monopole defects in artificial spin-ice lattices.},
author = {Phatak, C and Petford-Long, A K and Tanase, M and Heinonen, O. and De Graef, M and MSD) and Carnegie Mellon Univ.) and Northwestern Univ.) and NIST)},
abstractNote = {Artificially frustrated spin-ice systems are of considerable interest since they simulate the spin frustration and concomitant rich behavior exhibited by atoms on a crystal lattice in naturally occurring spin-ice systems such as pyrochlores. As a result of the magnetic frustration, these systems can exhibit 'magnetic monopole' type defects, which are an example of an exotic emergent quasiparticle. The local magnetization structure of such monopole defects determines their stability and thus is critical to understanding their behavior. In this paper, we report on the direct observation at room temperature of the nanoscale magnetic structure of individual magnetic monopoles in an artificially frustrated two-dimensional square spin-ice lattice, using high-resolution aberration-corrected Lorentz transmission electron microscopy. By combining the high-resolution microscopy with micromagnetic simulation, we demonstrate how nucleation of defect strings, reminiscent of Dirac strings, connecting monopole defects controls the demagnetization process in these spin-ice lattices.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.83.174431},
journal = {Phys. Rev. B},
number = 17 ; May 18, 2011,
volume = 83,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {5}
}