skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Power system applications for PASC converter systems

Abstract

This paper shows, using computer EMTP simulations, some preliminary results of applying pulse amplitude synthesis and control (PASC) technology to single-source level voltage converter system. The method can be applied to any single terminal pair source with appropriate modifications in power extraction interface and computer control program to match source and load impedance characteristics. The PASC realization as discussed here employs banks of transformers, one bank per phase, in which the primaries are connected in parallel through a switch matrix to the dc source. Two opposite polarity primaries per transformer are pulsed alternatively in time to produce an oscillatory sinusoidal output waveform. PASC conversion system capabilities to produce both leading and lagging power factor power output in single-phase and three-phase {Delta} or Y configurations are illustrated. EMTP simulations are used to demonstrate the converter capabilities. Also included are discussions regarding harmonics and potential control strategies to adapt the converter to an application or to minimize harmonics.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10158437
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-23362; CONF-9404175-1
ON: DE94013329
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers/Power Engineering Society (IEEE/PES) transmission and distribution conference,Chicago, IL (United States),10-15 Apr 1994; Other Information: PBD: Apr 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; DC TO DC CONVERTERS; E CODES; INVERTERS; TRANSFORMERS; COMPUTERIZED CONTROL SYSTEMS; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; 426000; 990200; COMPONENTS, ELECTRON DEVICES AND CIRCUITS; MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTERS

Citation Formats

Donnelly, M.K., and Johnson, R.M. Power system applications for PASC converter systems. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Donnelly, M.K., & Johnson, R.M. Power system applications for PASC converter systems. United States.
Donnelly, M.K., and Johnson, R.M. Fri . "Power system applications for PASC converter systems". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10158437.
@article{osti_10158437,
title = {Power system applications for PASC converter systems},
author = {Donnelly, M.K. and Johnson, R.M.},
abstractNote = {This paper shows, using computer EMTP simulations, some preliminary results of applying pulse amplitude synthesis and control (PASC) technology to single-source level voltage converter system. The method can be applied to any single terminal pair source with appropriate modifications in power extraction interface and computer control program to match source and load impedance characteristics. The PASC realization as discussed here employs banks of transformers, one bank per phase, in which the primaries are connected in parallel through a switch matrix to the dc source. Two opposite polarity primaries per transformer are pulsed alternatively in time to produce an oscillatory sinusoidal output waveform. PASC conversion system capabilities to produce both leading and lagging power factor power output in single-phase and three-phase {Delta} or Y configurations are illustrated. EMTP simulations are used to demonstrate the converter capabilities. Also included are discussions regarding harmonics and potential control strategies to adapt the converter to an application or to minimize harmonics.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Fri Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • This paper shows, using computer EMTP simulations, some preliminary results of applying pulse amplitude synthesis and control (PASC) technology to single-source voltage converter systems. The method can be applied to any single terminal pair source with appropriate modifications in power extraction interface and computer control program to match source and load impedance characteristics. The PASC realization as discussed here employs banks of transformers, one bank per phase, in which the primary are connected in parallel through a switch matrix to the dc source. Two opposite polarity primaries per transformer are pulsed alternatively in time to produce an oscillatory sinusoidal outputmore » waveform. PASC conversion system capabilities to produce both leading and lagging power factor power output in single-phase and three-phase {Delta} or Y configurations are illustrated. EHTP simulations are used to demonstrate the converter capabilities. Also included are discussions regarding harmonics and potential control strategies to adapt the converter to an application or to minimize harmonics.« less
  • In this paper, the problem of power waveform synthesis using the PASC technique to produce a desired output from a MHD single dc source generator is presented. In the case of a practical MHD diagonal generator In which actual end consolidation from multiple electrode pairs is usually accomplished by introduction of a dissipative resistive network grid, a small modification to the idealized two terminal PASC power electronic network presented here will accomplish the same function, but with much less dissipation. The PASC process utilizes a switching array to connect/disconnect one or more dc sources in an overlapped fashion under computermore » actuation, along with error output signal feedback, to generate the control necessary to match the desired waveform as specified in the computer. The principal benefit of this system for the single output source diagonal MHD generator is that quantized sinusoids can be generated having low harmonic content and dynamic power factor control without the need for large and expensive filtering and VAR compensation such as is required for conventional inverters. Further MHD advantages include the increase in control flexibility to provide rapid generator load management, isolation, and harmonic control versus output level.« less
  • This paper briefly presents the RPM-SIM simulator and, in particular, its abilities to simulate and analyze renewable energy systems with power converters. This modular simulation system is used to study applications and cost-effective performance of renewable energy systems, analyze both static and dynamic performance, develop control strategies, and simulate autonomous renewable energy systems under different generation and load conditions (such as different wind speeds, temperature, insolation conditions, and load profiles).
  • The main objective of staff exchanges is to facilitate cooperative activities between PNL staff and U.S. private industry. Funding for the projects is provided by the DOE Office of Energy Research Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Dr. Matthew Donnelly, a Research Engineer in the Applied Physics Center, Initiated a PNL disclosure for Pulse Amplitude Synthesis and Control (PASC) converter intellectual property protection in 1993. PASC converter research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been funded through the ETDI LDRD program. Recent work has centered on building the three-phase 20kW laboratory unit, the development of control algorithms and the study ofmore » the application of PASC converters in a 25MW wind power plant (through the staff exchange with RLA reported on here). An overview and description of the PASC converter is included as Appendix A.« less