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Title: Flow visualization for Lagrangian particle methods

Abstract

In particle methods, each particle represents a finite region over which there is a distribution of the field quantity of interest. The field value at any point is calculated by summing the distribution functions for all the particles. This summation procedure does not require the use of any connectivities to generate continuous fields. Various AVS modules and networks have been developed that enable us to visualize the results from particle methods. This will be demonstrated by visualizing a numerical simulation of a rising, chaotic bubble. In this fluid dynamics simulation, each particle represents a region with a specified vorticity distribution.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10147528
Report Number(s):
SAND-94-0839C; CONF-9405139-1
ON: DE94010757; BR: GB0103012
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1994 international American Vacuum Society users conference,Boston, MA (United States),2-13 May 1994; Other Information: PBD: [1994]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; FLOW VISUALIZATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; LAGRANGIAN FUNCTION; TWO-PHASE FLOW; NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS; BUBBLES; VORTICES; 420400; 990200; HEAT TRANSFER AND FLUID FLOW; MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTERS

Citation Formats

Glass, M.W., and Kempka, S.N. Flow visualization for Lagrangian particle methods. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Glass, M.W., & Kempka, S.N. Flow visualization for Lagrangian particle methods. United States.
Glass, M.W., and Kempka, S.N. 1994. "Flow visualization for Lagrangian particle methods". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10147528.
@article{osti_10147528,
title = {Flow visualization for Lagrangian particle methods},
author = {Glass, M.W. and Kempka, S.N.},
abstractNote = {In particle methods, each particle represents a finite region over which there is a distribution of the field quantity of interest. The field value at any point is calculated by summing the distribution functions for all the particles. This summation procedure does not require the use of any connectivities to generate continuous fields. Various AVS modules and networks have been developed that enable us to visualize the results from particle methods. This will be demonstrated by visualizing a numerical simulation of a rising, chaotic bubble. In this fluid dynamics simulation, each particle represents a region with a specified vorticity distribution.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 5
}

Conference:
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