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Title: Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report

Abstract

Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10145819
Report Number(s):
DOE/MC/26034-3083
ON: DE92001269
DOE Contract Number:
AC21-89MC26034
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jan 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; MEMBRANES; DESIGN; TESTING; HYDROGEN; PRODUCTION; PROGRESS REPORT; SEPARATION PROCESSES; CARBON; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; POROSITY; POLYMERS; DEPOSITION; PERMEABILITY; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; SHIFT PROCESSES; CARBON MONOXIDE; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; SIMULATION; 080107; 010402; 010404; COAL GASIFICATION; PURIFICATION AND UPGRADING; GASIFICATION

Citation Formats

Damle, A.S., and Gangwal, S.K.. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report. United States: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.2172/10145819.
Damle, A.S., & Gangwal, S.K.. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report. United States. doi:10.2172/10145819.
Damle, A.S., and Gangwal, S.K.. 1992. "Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report". United States. doi:10.2172/10145819. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10145819.
@article{osti_10145819,
title = {Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report},
author = {Damle, A.S. and Gangwal, S.K.},
abstractNote = {Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)},
doi = {10.2172/10145819},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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  • Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes weremore » used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)« less
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  • Pyrite, the pyrrhotites, and troilite catalyze the oxidation of 1-pentanethiol to pentyl disulfide in the temperature range 373 to 523K in both H/sub 2/ and He. The reaction is catalytic over the iron sulfides and is influenced by the presence of traces of O/sub 2/. The iron sulfides may act as electron transfer catalysts. Additionally, troilite catalyzes the half-hydrogenation of 2-pentyne to cis- and trans-2-pentene with greater than 95% selectivity. 13 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.
  • Exxon Enterprises, Inc., at the request of EPRI, has completed an evaluation of Alsthom/Exxon alkaline fuel cell technology for application to utility power generation. The purpose of this study was to determine how close the technology could come to EPRI efficiency, investment, and related targets and to begin to define those limitations which must still be overcome. The program consisted primarily of a systems analysis to explore the effect of major variables such as fuel cell operating temperature, fuel type and degree of carbon oxides preremoval on efficiency and cost. Most of the effort centered around minimizing cost and heatmore » rate by selecting the most appropriate process techniques and by heat integrating the various parts of the process. Two routes were found for meeting the EPRI heat rate targets, 7100 Btu/kWh with methanol and 7500 Btu/kWh with naphtha as starting fuel. The simplest route involved reforming followed by Pressure Swing Absorption yielding a nearly pure hydrogen feed to the fuel cell. Alternatively, carbonate scrubbing could be used but required an increased fuel cell temperature of 393/sup 0/K so that waste heat could be used for carbonate regeneration. The major uncertainty was in the assumed fuel cell performance which while taken from the literature for alkaline fuel cells has not yet been achieved with Alsthom/Exxon components. Investments for a 400 MW plant were between 20 and 30 percent higher than the target of $200/kW in 1974 dollars. Since the estimates contain no allowance for contingencies it would be unrealistic to project lower costs.« less