skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Idaho Supplementation Studies, 1991-1992 Annual Report.

Abstract

Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) will help determine the utility of supplementation as a potential recovery tool for decimated stocks of spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho. The objectives are to monitor and evaluate the effects of supplementation on presmolt and smolt numbers and spawning escapements of naturally produced salmon; monitor and evaluate changes in natural productivity and genetic composition of target and adjacent populations following supplementation and; determine which supplementation strategies (broodstock and release stage) provide the quickest effects on and highest response in natural production without adverse productivity.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho Department of Fish and Game
Sponsoring Org.:
United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
OSTI Identifier:
10116888
Report Number(s):
DOE/BP-01466-2
R&D Project: 198909800; ON: DE94005640; BR: CF02 -000
DOE Contract Number:
1989BP01466
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SALMON; POPULATION DYNAMICS; HABITAT; FISHERIES; PRODUCTION; IDAHO; TRAPS; PROGRESS REPORT; Chinook salmon - Effects of dams on - idaho; 130600; 540310; ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS; BASIC STUDIES

Citation Formats

Leitzinger, Eric J., Bowles, Edward C., and Plaster, Kurtis. Idaho Supplementation Studies, 1991-1992 Annual Report.. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/10116888.
Leitzinger, Eric J., Bowles, Edward C., & Plaster, Kurtis. Idaho Supplementation Studies, 1991-1992 Annual Report.. United States. doi:10.2172/10116888.
Leitzinger, Eric J., Bowles, Edward C., and Plaster, Kurtis. 1993. "Idaho Supplementation Studies, 1991-1992 Annual Report.". United States. doi:10.2172/10116888. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10116888.
@article{osti_10116888,
title = {Idaho Supplementation Studies, 1991-1992 Annual Report.},
author = {Leitzinger, Eric J. and Bowles, Edward C. and Plaster, Kurtis},
abstractNote = {Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) will help determine the utility of supplementation as a potential recovery tool for decimated stocks of spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho. The objectives are to monitor and evaluate the effects of supplementation on presmolt and smolt numbers and spawning escapements of naturally produced salmon; monitor and evaluate changes in natural productivity and genetic composition of target and adjacent populations following supplementation and; determine which supplementation strategies (broodstock and release stage) provide the quickest effects on and highest response in natural production without adverse productivity.},
doi = {10.2172/10116888},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month =
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • This is the first annual summary of results for chinook salmon supplementation studies in Idaho Rivers conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Management. The Nez Perce Tribe has coordinated chinook salmon supplementation research activities with the Bonneville Power Administration, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, U. S. Forest Service, and the Shoshone Bannock Tribe. The project is a cooperative effort involving members of the Idaho Supplementation Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC). This project has also been extensively coordinated with the Supplementation Technical Work Group (STWG) which identified specificmore » research needs and integrated and coordinated supplementation research activities through development of a five year work plan. In this study we are assessing what strategies, both brood stock and release stage, are best for supplementing natural or depleted spring and summer chinook populations and what effect supplementation has on these populations. This research should identify which of the supplementation strategies employed are beneficial in terms of increasing adult returns and the ability of these returns to sustain themselves. Biological evaluation points will be parr density, survival to Lower Granite Dam, adult return to weirs, redd counts and presmolt and smolt yield from both treatment and control streams. Genetic monitoring of treatment and control populations will also occur. The supplementation research study has the following objectives: (1) Monitor and evaluate the effect of supplementation on presmolt and smolt numbers and spawning escapements of naturally produced salmon. (2) Monitor and evaluate changes in natural productivity and genetic composition of target and adjacent populations following supplementation. (3) Determine which supplementation strategies (brood stock and release stage) provide the quickest and highest response in natural production without adverse effects on productivity. (4) Coordinate supplementation research planning and field evaluation program activities and management recommendations for the Nez Perce Tribe.« less
  • The purpose of this study is to help determine the utility of supplementation as a potential recovery tool for decimated stocks of spring and summer chinook salmon in Idaho. The goals are to assess the use of hatchery chinook to restore or augment natural populations, and to evaluate the effects of supplementation on the survival and fitness of existing natural populations.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • This report summarizes brood year 1999 juvenile production and emigration data and adult return information for 2000 for streams studied by the Nez Perce Tribe for the cooperative Idaho Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (ISS) project. In order to provide inclusive juvenile data for brood year 1999, we include data on parr, presmolt, smolt and yearling captures. Therefore, our reporting period includes juvenile data collected from April 2000 through June 2001 for parr, presmolts, and smolts and through June 2002 for brood year 1999 yearling emigrants. Data presented in this report include; fish outplant data for treatment streams, snorkelmore » and screw trap estimates of juvenile fish abundance, juvenile emigration profiles, juvenile survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam (LGJ), redd counts, and carcass data. There were no brood year 1999 treatments in Legendary Bear or Fishing Creek. As in previous years, snorkeling methods provided highly variable population estimates. Alternatively, rotary screw traps operated in Lake Creek and the Secesh River provided more precise estimates of juvenile abundance by life history type. Juvenile fish emigration in Lake Creek and the Secesh River peaked during July and August. Juveniles produced in this watershed emigrated primarily at age zero, and apparently reared in downstream habitats before detection as age one or older fish at the Snake and Columbia River dams. Over the course of the ISS study, PIT tag data suggest that smolts typically exhibit the highest relative survival to Lower Granite Dam (LGJ) compared to presmolts and parr, although we observed the opposite trend for brood year 1999 juvenile emigrants from the Secesh River. SURPH2 survival estimates for brood year 1999 Lake Creek parr, presmolt, and smolt PIT tag groups to (LGJ) were 27%, 39%, and 49% respectively, and 14%, 12%, and 5% for the Secesh River. In 2000, we counted 41 redds in Legendary Bear Creek, 4 in Fishing Creek, 5 in Slate Creek, 153 in the Secesh River, and 180 in Lake Creek. We recovered 19 carcasses (11 natural 8 hatchery) in Legendary Bear Creek, one hatchery carcass in Fishing Creek, zero carcasses in Slate Creek, 82 carcasses (19 of unknown origin and 63 natural) in the Secesh River, and 178 carcasses (2 hatchery 176 natural) from Lake Creek. In 2000 the majority (82%) of carcasses were recovered in index spawning reaches. Preliminary analysis of brood year 1997 PIT tag return data for the Secesh River and Lake Creek yields LGJ to Lower Granite Dam (LGD) juvenile to adult survival rates of, 0.00% for parr, 0.20% for presmolts, and 3.13% for smolts. LGJ to LGD juvenile to adult return rates for brood year 1997 Legendary Bear Creek were 2.98% for naturally produced PIT tagged smolts and 0.89% for PIT tagged supplementation smolts. No adults were detected at LGD from brood year 1997 parr released in Fishing Creek.« less