skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6

Abstract

Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis showed U precipitates containing nearly equal fractions of U(IV) and U(VI), whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI). Mass balance calculations for U and P corroborate these observations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR42TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids. The U(VI)-phosphate precipitates, confirmed by EDS as containing U and P in equimolar concentrations, had nanometer sized lath structure. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, U reduction became the dominant removal mechanism, in contrast to primarily phosphate-mediated precipitation observedmore » in the absence of AQDS. Uranium immobilization by abiotic precipitation or microbial reduction has been extensively reported; however, present work suggests that strain ES6 can remove U(VI) from solution simultaneously through precipitation with phosphate ligands and microbial reduction, depending on the environmental conditions. Cellulomonadaceae are environmentally relevant subsurface bacteria and here, for the first time, t 52 he presence of multiple U immobilization mechanisms within one organism is reported using Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - SC
OSTI Identifier:
1010687
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-10-18458
Journal ID: ISSN 0006-3592
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Biotechnology and Bioengineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0006-3592
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/GENOMICS/GENOME RESEARCH; bioremediation; Cellulomonas; U(VI) reduction; U(VI)-phosphate; Uranyl; XANES

Citation Formats

Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran, Peyton, Brent, Viamajala, Sridhar, Gerlach, Robin, Apel, William, Sani, Rajesh, Dohnalkova, Alice, and Borch, Thomas. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1002/bit.22956.
Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran, Peyton, Brent, Viamajala, Sridhar, Gerlach, Robin, Apel, William, Sani, Rajesh, Dohnalkova, Alice, & Borch, Thomas. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. United States. doi:10.1002/bit.22956.
Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran, Peyton, Brent, Viamajala, Sridhar, Gerlach, Robin, Apel, William, Sani, Rajesh, Dohnalkova, Alice, and Borch, Thomas. Tue . "Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6". United States. doi:10.1002/bit.22956.
@article{osti_1010687,
title = {Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6},
author = {Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran and Peyton, Brent and Viamajala, Sridhar and Gerlach, Robin and Apel, William and Sani, Rajesh and Dohnalkova, Alice and Borch, Thomas},
abstractNote = {Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis showed U precipitates containing nearly equal fractions of U(IV) and U(VI), whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI). Mass balance calculations for U and P corroborate these observations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR42TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids. The U(VI)-phosphate precipitates, confirmed by EDS as containing U and P in equimolar concentrations, had nanometer sized lath structure. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, U reduction became the dominant removal mechanism, in contrast to primarily phosphate-mediated precipitation observed in the absence of AQDS. Uranium immobilization by abiotic precipitation or microbial reduction has been extensively reported; however, present work suggests that strain ES6 can remove U(VI) from solution simultaneously through precipitation with phosphate ligands and microbial reduction, depending on the environmental conditions. Cellulomonadaceae are environmentally relevant subsurface bacteria and here, for the first time, t 52 he presence of multiple U immobilization mechanisms within one organism is reported using Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.},
doi = {10.1002/bit.22956},
journal = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering},
issn = {0006-3592},
number = 2,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {2}
}