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Title: Dynamic View on Nanostructures: A Technique for Time Resolved Optical Luminescence Using Synchrotron Light Pulses at SRC, APS, and CLS

Abstract

We present an experimental technique using the time structure of synchrotron radiation to study time resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence. In particular we are taking advantage of the bunched distribution of electrons in a synchrotron storage ring, giving short x-ray pulses (10-10{sup 2} picoseconds) which are separated by non-radiating gaps on the nano- to tens of nanosecond scale - sufficiently wide to study a broad range of optical decay channels observed in advanced nanostructured materials.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. (ISTM-CNR/ISTM, Padova (Italy))
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1009004
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Ninth International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation;28 May - 2 June 2006;Daegu, Korea
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; DECAY; DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRONS; LUMINESCENCE; NANOSTRUCTURES; STORAGE RINGS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; SYNCHROTRONS

Citation Formats

Heigl, F., Jurgensen, A., Zhou, X.-T., Lam, S., Murphy, M., Ko, J.Y.P., Sham, T.K., Rosenberg, R.A., Gordon, R., Brewe, D., Regier, T., Armelao, L., CLS), APS), UWO), Simon), and CSRF). Dynamic View on Nanostructures: A Technique for Time Resolved Optical Luminescence Using Synchrotron Light Pulses at SRC, APS, and CLS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Heigl, F., Jurgensen, A., Zhou, X.-T., Lam, S., Murphy, M., Ko, J.Y.P., Sham, T.K., Rosenberg, R.A., Gordon, R., Brewe, D., Regier, T., Armelao, L., CLS), APS), UWO), Simon), & CSRF). Dynamic View on Nanostructures: A Technique for Time Resolved Optical Luminescence Using Synchrotron Light Pulses at SRC, APS, and CLS. United States.
Heigl, F., Jurgensen, A., Zhou, X.-T., Lam, S., Murphy, M., Ko, J.Y.P., Sham, T.K., Rosenberg, R.A., Gordon, R., Brewe, D., Regier, T., Armelao, L., CLS), APS), UWO), Simon), and CSRF). 2007. "Dynamic View on Nanostructures: A Technique for Time Resolved Optical Luminescence Using Synchrotron Light Pulses at SRC, APS, and CLS". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1009004,
title = {Dynamic View on Nanostructures: A Technique for Time Resolved Optical Luminescence Using Synchrotron Light Pulses at SRC, APS, and CLS},
author = {Heigl, F. and Jurgensen, A. and Zhou, X.-T. and Lam, S. and Murphy, M. and Ko, J.Y.P. and Sham, T.K. and Rosenberg, R.A. and Gordon, R. and Brewe, D. and Regier, T. and Armelao, L. and CLS) and APS) and UWO) and Simon) and CSRF)},
abstractNote = {We present an experimental technique using the time structure of synchrotron radiation to study time resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence. In particular we are taking advantage of the bunched distribution of electrons in a synchrotron storage ring, giving short x-ray pulses (10-10{sup 2} picoseconds) which are separated by non-radiating gaps on the nano- to tens of nanosecond scale - sufficiently wide to study a broad range of optical decay channels observed in advanced nanostructured materials.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • We present an experimental technique using the time structure of synchrotron radiation to study time resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence. In particular we are taking advantage of the bunched distribution of electrons in a synchrotron storage ring, giving short x-ray pulses (10-102 picoseconds) which are separated by non-radiating gaps on the nano- to tens of nanosecond scale - sufficiently wide to study a broad range of optical decay channels observed in advanced nanostructured materials.
  • X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) is a well established technique to study nano structured light emitting materials. XEOL bares the essential features necessary for the study of advanced nano structured materials like element specifity, good quantum efficiency, and easy approach for time resolution. Being sensitive to the geometry of the material on a nano-scale, luminescence gives insight into the phenomenologic correlation of structural, optical, and electronic properties. Besides structural aspects we study the time behavior of nanostructured ZnO (Eu) in a pump-probe like experiment, using the time structure of synchrotron radiation.
  • Electron synchrotron storage rings, such as the VUV ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), produce short pulses of infrared (IR) radiation suitable for investigating the time-dependent phenomena in a variety of interesting experimental systems. In contrast to other pulses sources of IR, the synchrotron produces a continuum spectral output over the entire IR (and beyond), though at power levels typically below those obtained from laser systems. The infrared synchrotron radiation (IRSR) source is therefore well-suited as a probe using standard FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Here the authors describe the pump-probe spectroscopy facility being established at the NSLS and demonstratemore » the technique by measuring the photocarrier decay in a semiconductor.« less
  • UV femtosecond light pulses can easily be used to excite alkali-halides by two-photon absorption and to measure two-photon absorption coefficients. In CsI doped with Na the two photon absorption is followed by luminescence centered around 420 nm. This nonlinear-optical process of second-order can be utilized to measure correlation functions for determining durations of UV femtosecond light pulses with high sensitivity and without critical requirements for the alignment.