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Title: Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems

Abstract

The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the largest superfamilies of paralogous sequences. All ABC systems share a highly conserved ATP-hydrolyzing domain or protein (the ABC; also referred to as a nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]) that is unequivocally characterized by three short sequence motifs (Fig. 1): these are the Walker A and Walker B motifs, indicative of the presence of a nucleotide-binding site, and the signature motif, unique to ABC proteins, located upstream of the Walker B motif (426). Other motifs diagnostic of ABC proteins are also indicated in Fig. 1. The biological significance of these motifs is discussed in Structure, Function, and Dynamics of the ABC. ABC systems are widespread among living organisms and have been detected in all genera of the three kingdoms of life, with remarkable conservation in the primary sequence of the cassette and in the organization of the constitutive domains or subunits (203, 420). ABC systems couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to an impressively large variety of essential biological phenomena, comprising not only transmembrane (TM) transport, for which they are best known, but also several non-transport-related processes, such as translation elongation (62) and DNA repair (174). Although ABC systems deserve much attention because theymore » are involved in severe human inherited diseases (107), they were first discovered and characterized in detail in prokaryotes, as early as the 1970s (13, 148, 238, 468). The most extensively analyzed systems were the high-affinity histidine and maltose uptake systems of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Over 2 decades ago, after the completion of the nucleotide sequences encoding these transporters in the respective laboratories of Giovanna Ames and Maurice Hofnung, Hiroshi Nikaido and colleagues noticed that the two systems displayed a global similarity in the nature of their components and, moreover, that the primary sequences of MalK and HisP, the proteins suspected to energize these transporters, shared as much as 32% identity in amino acid residues when their sequences were aligned (171). Later, it was found that several bacterial proteins involved in uptake of nutrients, export of toxins, cell division, bacterial nodulation of plants, and DNA repair displayed the same similarity in their sequences (127, 196). This led to the notion that the conserved protein, which had been shown to bind ATP (198, 201), would probably energize the systems mentioned above by coupling the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport. The latter was demonstrated with the maltose and histidine transporters by use of isolated membrane vesicles (105, 379) and purified transporters reconstituted into proteoliposomes (30, 98). The determination of the sequence of the first eukaryotic protein strongly similar to these bacterial transporters (the P-glycoprotein, involved in resistance of cancer cells to multiple drugs) (169, 179) demonstrated that these proteins were not restricted to prokaryotes. Two names, 'traffic ATPases' (15) and the more accepted name 'ABC transporters' (193, 218), were proposed for members of this new superfamily. ABC systems can be divided into three main functional categories, as follows. Importers mediate the uptake of nutrients in prokaryotes. The nature of the substrates that are transported is very wide, including mono- and oligosaccharides, organic and inorganic ions, amino acids, peptides, ironsiderophores, metals, polyamine cations, opines, and vitamins. Exporters are involved in the secretion of various molecules, such as peptides, lipids, hydrophobic drugs, polysaccharides, and proteins, including toxins such as hemolysin. The third category of systems is apparently not involved in transport, with some members being involved in translation of mRNA and in DNA repair. Despite the large, diverse population of substrates handled and the difference in the polarity of transport, importers and exporters share a common organization made of two hydrophobic membrane-spanning or integral membrane (IM) domains and two hydrophilic domains carrying the ABC peripherally associated with the IM domains on the cytosolic side of the membrane (26). In importers, these four domains are almost always independent polypeptide chains that come together to form a multimeric complex. In most exporters, including the E. coli hemolysin exporter HlyB, the N-terminal IM and the C-terminal ABC domains are fused as a single polypeptide chain (IM-ABC). An inverted organization in which the IM domain is C-terminal with respect to the ABC domain (ABC-IM) exists, such as in the MacB protein, involved in macrolide resistance in E. coli. No IM domain partners have been identified for ABC proteins falling into the third category, and these proteins consist of two ABCs fused together (ABC2).« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Purdue
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1007155
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Microbiol. Mol. Biol R.
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: (2) ; 06, 2008
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AMINO ACIDS; ATP; CELL DIVISION; DISEASES; DNA REPAIR; ESCHERICHIA COLI; HEMOLYSINS; HISTIDINE; HYDROLYSIS; LIPIDS; MALTOSE; MEMBRANES; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEOTIDES; NUTRIENTS; OLIGOSACCHARIDES; PEPTIDES; POLYPEPTIDES; POLYSACCHARIDES; PROTEINS; SALMONELLA; SUBSTRATES; TOXINS; VITAMINS

Citation Formats

Davidson, A L, Dassa, E, Orelle, C, and Chen, J. Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Davidson, A L, Dassa, E, Orelle, C, & Chen, J. Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems. United States.
Davidson, A L, Dassa, E, Orelle, C, and Chen, J. Tue . "Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems". United States.
@article{osti_1007155,
title = {Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems},
author = {Davidson, A L and Dassa, E and Orelle, C and Chen, J},
abstractNote = {The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the largest superfamilies of paralogous sequences. All ABC systems share a highly conserved ATP-hydrolyzing domain or protein (the ABC; also referred to as a nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]) that is unequivocally characterized by three short sequence motifs (Fig. 1): these are the Walker A and Walker B motifs, indicative of the presence of a nucleotide-binding site, and the signature motif, unique to ABC proteins, located upstream of the Walker B motif (426). Other motifs diagnostic of ABC proteins are also indicated in Fig. 1. The biological significance of these motifs is discussed in Structure, Function, and Dynamics of the ABC. ABC systems are widespread among living organisms and have been detected in all genera of the three kingdoms of life, with remarkable conservation in the primary sequence of the cassette and in the organization of the constitutive domains or subunits (203, 420). ABC systems couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to an impressively large variety of essential biological phenomena, comprising not only transmembrane (TM) transport, for which they are best known, but also several non-transport-related processes, such as translation elongation (62) and DNA repair (174). Although ABC systems deserve much attention because they are involved in severe human inherited diseases (107), they were first discovered and characterized in detail in prokaryotes, as early as the 1970s (13, 148, 238, 468). The most extensively analyzed systems were the high-affinity histidine and maltose uptake systems of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Over 2 decades ago, after the completion of the nucleotide sequences encoding these transporters in the respective laboratories of Giovanna Ames and Maurice Hofnung, Hiroshi Nikaido and colleagues noticed that the two systems displayed a global similarity in the nature of their components and, moreover, that the primary sequences of MalK and HisP, the proteins suspected to energize these transporters, shared as much as 32% identity in amino acid residues when their sequences were aligned (171). Later, it was found that several bacterial proteins involved in uptake of nutrients, export of toxins, cell division, bacterial nodulation of plants, and DNA repair displayed the same similarity in their sequences (127, 196). This led to the notion that the conserved protein, which had been shown to bind ATP (198, 201), would probably energize the systems mentioned above by coupling the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport. The latter was demonstrated with the maltose and histidine transporters by use of isolated membrane vesicles (105, 379) and purified transporters reconstituted into proteoliposomes (30, 98). The determination of the sequence of the first eukaryotic protein strongly similar to these bacterial transporters (the P-glycoprotein, involved in resistance of cancer cells to multiple drugs) (169, 179) demonstrated that these proteins were not restricted to prokaryotes. Two names, 'traffic ATPases' (15) and the more accepted name 'ABC transporters' (193, 218), were proposed for members of this new superfamily. ABC systems can be divided into three main functional categories, as follows. Importers mediate the uptake of nutrients in prokaryotes. The nature of the substrates that are transported is very wide, including mono- and oligosaccharides, organic and inorganic ions, amino acids, peptides, ironsiderophores, metals, polyamine cations, opines, and vitamins. Exporters are involved in the secretion of various molecules, such as peptides, lipids, hydrophobic drugs, polysaccharides, and proteins, including toxins such as hemolysin. The third category of systems is apparently not involved in transport, with some members being involved in translation of mRNA and in DNA repair. Despite the large, diverse population of substrates handled and the difference in the polarity of transport, importers and exporters share a common organization made of two hydrophobic membrane-spanning or integral membrane (IM) domains and two hydrophilic domains carrying the ABC peripherally associated with the IM domains on the cytosolic side of the membrane (26). In importers, these four domains are almost always independent polypeptide chains that come together to form a multimeric complex. In most exporters, including the E. coli hemolysin exporter HlyB, the N-terminal IM and the C-terminal ABC domains are fused as a single polypeptide chain (IM-ABC). An inverted organization in which the IM domain is C-terminal with respect to the ABC domain (ABC-IM) exists, such as in the MacB protein, involved in macrolide resistance in E. coli. No IM domain partners have been identified for ABC proteins falling into the third category, and these proteins consist of two ABCs fused together (ABC2).},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1007155}, journal = {Microbiol. Mol. Biol R.},
number = (2) ; 06, 2008,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {7}
}