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Title: Introducing FACETS, the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations

Abstract

The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project began in January 2007 with the goal of providing core to wall transport modeling of a tokamak fusion reactor. This involves coupling previously separate computations for the core, edge, and wall regions. Such a coupling is primarily through connection regions of lower dimensionality. The project has started developing a component-based coupling framework to bring together models for each of these regions. In the first year, the core model will be a 1 dimensional model (1D transport across flux surfaces coupled to a 2D equilibrium) with fixed equilibrium. The initial edge model will be the fluid model, UEDGE, but inclusion of kinetic models is planned for the out years. The project also has an embedded Scientific Application Partnership that is examining embedding a full-scale turbulence model for obtaining the crosssurface fluxes into a core transport code.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [5];  [4];  [6];  [4];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [1] more »;  [3];  [4];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [6];  [6];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [11] « less
  1. Tech-X Corporation
  2. General Atomics
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
  4. ORNL
  5. Colorado State University, Fort Collins
  6. University of Oregon
  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)
  8. University of California, San Diego
  9. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  10. New York University
  11. Lodestar Research Corporation
  12. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)
  13. Columbia University
  14. Indiana University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1005179
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 78; Conference: SciDAC 2007, Boston, MA, USA, 20070624, 20070628
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Cary, John R., Candy, Jeff, Cohen, Ronald H., Krasheninnikov, Sergei I, McCune, Douglas C, Estep, Donald J, Larson, Jay W, Malony, Allen, Worley, Patrick H, Carlsson, Johan Anders, Hakim, A H, Hamill, P, Kruger, Scott E, Muzsala, S, Pletzer, Alexander, Shasharina, Svetlana, Wade-Stein, D, Wang, N, McInnes, Lois C, Wildey, T, Casper, T. A., Diachin, Lori A, Epperly, Thomas, Rognlien, T. D., Fahey, Mark R, Kuehn, Jeffery A, Morris, A, Shende, Sameer, Feibush, E, Hammett, Gregory W, Indireshkumar, K, Ludescher, C, Randerson, L, Stotler, D., Pigarov, A, Bonoli, P., Chang, C.M., D'Ippolito, D. A., Colella, Philip, Keyes, David E, Bramley, R, and Myra, J. R. Introducing FACETS, the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/78/1/012086.
Cary, John R., Candy, Jeff, Cohen, Ronald H., Krasheninnikov, Sergei I, McCune, Douglas C, Estep, Donald J, Larson, Jay W, Malony, Allen, Worley, Patrick H, Carlsson, Johan Anders, Hakim, A H, Hamill, P, Kruger, Scott E, Muzsala, S, Pletzer, Alexander, Shasharina, Svetlana, Wade-Stein, D, Wang, N, McInnes, Lois C, Wildey, T, Casper, T. A., Diachin, Lori A, Epperly, Thomas, Rognlien, T. D., Fahey, Mark R, Kuehn, Jeffery A, Morris, A, Shende, Sameer, Feibush, E, Hammett, Gregory W, Indireshkumar, K, Ludescher, C, Randerson, L, Stotler, D., Pigarov, A, Bonoli, P., Chang, C.M., D'Ippolito, D. A., Colella, Philip, Keyes, David E, Bramley, R, & Myra, J. R. Introducing FACETS, the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations. United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/78/1/012086.
Cary, John R., Candy, Jeff, Cohen, Ronald H., Krasheninnikov, Sergei I, McCune, Douglas C, Estep, Donald J, Larson, Jay W, Malony, Allen, Worley, Patrick H, Carlsson, Johan Anders, Hakim, A H, Hamill, P, Kruger, Scott E, Muzsala, S, Pletzer, Alexander, Shasharina, Svetlana, Wade-Stein, D, Wang, N, McInnes, Lois C, Wildey, T, Casper, T. A., Diachin, Lori A, Epperly, Thomas, Rognlien, T. D., Fahey, Mark R, Kuehn, Jeffery A, Morris, A, Shende, Sameer, Feibush, E, Hammett, Gregory W, Indireshkumar, K, Ludescher, C, Randerson, L, Stotler, D., Pigarov, A, Bonoli, P., Chang, C.M., D'Ippolito, D. A., Colella, Philip, Keyes, David E, Bramley, R, and Myra, J. R. Mon . "Introducing FACETS, the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations". United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/78/1/012086.
@article{osti_1005179,
title = {Introducing FACETS, the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations},
author = {Cary, John R. and Candy, Jeff and Cohen, Ronald H. and Krasheninnikov, Sergei I and McCune, Douglas C and Estep, Donald J and Larson, Jay W and Malony, Allen and Worley, Patrick H and Carlsson, Johan Anders and Hakim, A H and Hamill, P and Kruger, Scott E and Muzsala, S and Pletzer, Alexander and Shasharina, Svetlana and Wade-Stein, D and Wang, N and McInnes, Lois C and Wildey, T and Casper, T. A. and Diachin, Lori A and Epperly, Thomas and Rognlien, T. D. and Fahey, Mark R and Kuehn, Jeffery A and Morris, A and Shende, Sameer and Feibush, E and Hammett, Gregory W and Indireshkumar, K and Ludescher, C and Randerson, L and Stotler, D. and Pigarov, A and Bonoli, P. and Chang, C.M. and D'Ippolito, D. A. and Colella, Philip and Keyes, David E and Bramley, R and Myra, J. R.},
abstractNote = {The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project began in January 2007 with the goal of providing core to wall transport modeling of a tokamak fusion reactor. This involves coupling previously separate computations for the core, edge, and wall regions. Such a coupling is primarily through connection regions of lower dimensionality. The project has started developing a component-based coupling framework to bring together models for each of these regions. In the first year, the core model will be a 1 dimensional model (1D transport across flux surfaces coupled to a 2D equilibrium) with fixed equilibrium. The initial edge model will be the fluid model, UEDGE, but inclusion of kinetic models is planned for the out years. The project also has an embedded Scientific Application Partnership that is examining embedding a full-scale turbulence model for obtaining the crosssurface fluxes into a core transport code.},
doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/78/1/012086},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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  • The mission of the Computer Science Scientific Application Partnership (C.S. SAP) at LLNL is to develop and apply leading-edge scientific component technology to FACETS software. Contributions from LLNL's fusion energy program staff towards the underlying physics modules are described in a separate report. FACETS uses component technology to combine selectively multiple physics and solver software modules written in different languages by different institutions together in an tightly-integrated, parallel computing framework for Tokamak reactor modeling. In the past fiscal year, the C.S. SAP has focused on two primary tasks: applying Babel to connect UEDGE into the FACETS framework through UEDGE's existingmore » Python interface and developing a next generation componentization strategy for UEDGE which avoids the use of Python. The FACETS project uses Babel to solve its language interoperability challenges. Specific accomplishments for the year include: (1) Refined SIDL interfaces for UEDGE to meet satisfy the standard interfaces required by FACETS for all physics modules. This required consensus building between framework and UEDGE developers. (2) Wrote prototype C++ driver for UEDGE to demonstrate how UEDGE can be called from C++ using Babel. (3) Supported the FACETS project by adding new features to Babel such as release number tagging, porting to new machines, and adding new configuration options. Babel modifications were delivered to FACETS by testing and publishing development snapshots in the projects software repository. (4) Assisted Tech-X Corporation in testing and debugging of a high level build system for the complete FACETS tool chain--the complete list of third-party software libraries that FACETS depends on directly or indirectly (e.g., MPI, HDF5, PACT, etc.). (5) Designed and implemented a new approach to wrapping UEDGE as a FACETS component without requiring Python. To get simulation results as soon as possible, our initial connection from the FACETS framework to UEDGE uses a Forthon-generated Python layer that sits on top of the UEDGE Fortran code. To run on leadership class machines that do not support shared libraries such as Franklin (NERSCS) and Jaguar (ORNL), FACETS requires a more direct connection to the UEDGE Fortran that eliminates the Python layer. We designed and developed an extension for Forthon to provide a direct connection from C++ to the UEDGE Fortran using Babel. This also required added annotations to the Forthon '.v' input files to indicate how function parameters are used.« less
  • This role of this computer science SAP is to facilitate FACETS design and development by contributing CCA component technology and new application-specific technology. From a software perspective, the FACETS project is a very complex project. It is a combination of legacy software written in Fortran, Python, and C++ by various coding groups along with new software modules being written from scratch. The FACETS team is spread among 11 organizations and is geographically distributed from coast to coast. The fusion physics modules to be incorporated vary in terms of the model dimensions, typical time scale, and type of interactions with othermore » components. Because FACETS is a complex project, it requires a component-based framework to facilitate the definition and composition of scientific applications from a suite of available fusion physics components. Component architectures have proven themselves in the business world and more recently in the scientific computing world. The CS SAP contributes fundamental tools like Babel to the FACETS framework and helps develop application-specific interfaces appropriate for the fusion physics modules.« less
  • This is the final report for the Colorado State University Component of the FACETS Project. FACETS was focused on the development of a multiphysics, parallel framework application that could provide the capability to enable whole-device fusion reactor modeling and, in the process, the development of the modeling infrastructure and computational understanding needed for ITER. It was intended that FACETS be highly flexible, through the use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, to facilitate switching from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics, and making it possible to use simplified models formore » rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that will take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS was designed in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application can take advantage through parallelism based on task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. As with all fusion simulations, an integral part of the FACETS project was treatment of the coupling of different physical processes at different scales interacting closely. A primary example for the FACETS project is the coupling of existing core and edge simulations, with the transport and wall interactions described by reduced models. However, core and edge simulations themselves involve significant coupling of different processes with large scale differences. Numerical treatment of coupling is impacted by a number of factors including, scale differences, form of information transferred between processes, implementation of solvers for different codes, and high performance computing concerns. Operator decomposition involving the computation of the individual processes individually using appropriate simulation codes and then linking/synchronizing the component simulations at regular points in space and time, is the defacto approach to high performance simulation of multiphysics, multiscale systems. Various forms of operator decomposition are used in nearly all fusion simulations. However, operator decomposition generally has a complex effect on accuracy and stability of numerical simulations. Yet, these effects can be difficult to detect. The Colorado State University component of the FACETS team led by P.I.D. Estep was focused on analyzing the effects of operator decomposition on fusion simulations. The approach was based on a posteriori error analysis employing adjoint problems, computable residuals, and variational analysis to produce accurate computational error estimates for quantities of interest. Computable residuals are used to quantify the effects of various discretization choices. The generalized Greens function satisfying the adjoint problem quantities the effects of stability. Technical issues to be addressed included: (1) defining appropriate adjoint operators for operator decomposition discretizations; (2) determining the appropriate residuals for the multifaceted aspects involved with multiphysics discretizations; (3) producing the estimates within the computational framework of existing fusion codes; (4) carrying out the analysis for discretizations used in fusion simulations; and (5) devising efficient approaches to mitigating the effects of discretization. This report provides a summary of the accomplished research and a detailed description of personnel, activities, outcomes and achievements.« less
  • The goal of the FACETS project (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) was to provide a multiphysics, parallel framework application (FACETS) that will enable whole-device modeling for the U.S. fusion program, to provide the modeling infrastructure needed for ITER, the next step fusion confinement device. Through use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, FACETS is able to switch from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics in a flexible manner. This enables use of simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that can take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware.more » FACETS does so in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application execute in parallel by utilizing task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. ParaTools, Inc. was tasked with supporting the performance analysis and tuning of the FACETS components and framework in order to achieve the parallel scaling goals of the project. The TAU Performance System┬« was used for instrumentation, measurement, archiving, and profile / tracing analysis. ParaTools, Inc. also assisted in FACETS performance engineering efforts. Through the use of the TAU Performance System, ParaTools provided instrumentation, measurement, analysis and archival support for the FACETS project. Performance optimization of key components has yielded significant performance speedups. TAU was integrated into the FACETS build for both the full coupled application and the UEDGE component. The performance database provided archival storage of the performance regression testing data generated by the project, and helped to track improvements in the software development.« less
  • The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PImore » was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.« less