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Title: Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.

Abstract

Operational satellite remote sensing data can provide the temporal repeatability necessary to capture phenological differences among species. This study develops a multitemporal stacking method coupled with spectral analysis for extracting information from Landsat imagery to provide species-level information. Temporal stacking can, in an approximate mathematical sense, effectively increase the 'spectral' resolution of the system by adding spectral bands of several multitemporal images. As a demonstration, multitemporal linear spectral unmixing is used to successfully delineate cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) from soil and surrounding vegetation (77% overall accuracy). This invasive plant is an ideal target for exploring multitemporal methods because of its phenological differences with other vegetation in early spring and, to a lesser degree, in late summer. The techniques developed in this work are directly applicable for other targets with temporally unique spectral differences.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. Idaho State University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1003775
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Remote Sensing; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACCURACY; CLASSIFICATION; PLANTS; REMOTE SENSING; RESOLUTION; SATELLITES; SOILS; TARGETS

Citation Formats

Singh, Nagendra, and Glenn, Nancy F. Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1080/01431160802562222.
Singh, Nagendra, & Glenn, Nancy F. Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.. United States. doi:10.1080/01431160802562222.
Singh, Nagendra, and Glenn, Nancy F. Wed . "Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.". United States. doi:10.1080/01431160802562222.
@article{osti_1003775,
title = {Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.},
author = {Singh, Nagendra and Glenn, Nancy F},
abstractNote = {Operational satellite remote sensing data can provide the temporal repeatability necessary to capture phenological differences among species. This study develops a multitemporal stacking method coupled with spectral analysis for extracting information from Landsat imagery to provide species-level information. Temporal stacking can, in an approximate mathematical sense, effectively increase the 'spectral' resolution of the system by adding spectral bands of several multitemporal images. As a demonstration, multitemporal linear spectral unmixing is used to successfully delineate cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) from soil and surrounding vegetation (77% overall accuracy). This invasive plant is an ideal target for exploring multitemporal methods because of its phenological differences with other vegetation in early spring and, to a lesser degree, in late summer. The techniques developed in this work are directly applicable for other targets with temporally unique spectral differences.},
doi = {10.1080/01431160802562222},
journal = {International Journal of Remote Sensing},
number = 13,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2009},
month = {Wed Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2009}
}
  • Experiments were conducted in a greenhouse with the following obtectives: (i) to study the emergence and seedling growth of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) in soil and in Paraho spent oil shale that was either leached, treated with sulfuric acid, covered with soil, or mixed with soil, and (ii) to study emergence and seedling growth of cheatgrass on spent shale that was fertilized with ammonium nitrate and triple superphosphate. The Ec/sub e/ of the spent shale was 14 mmhos/cm, the pH was 9 and the shale was low in plant available N and P. The soil from Federal oil shale leasemore » tract U-a near Bonanza, Utah was a coarse textured alluvium with low moisture retention. Cheatgrass planted on soil alone and shale covered with soil had the highest emergence rates (75 to 86%) and produced the greatest total biomass (8.55 to 13.4 g). Seedling emergence rates on leached and unleached spent shale were 44% and 36%, respectively, and total biomass was < 1 g on either treatment. Seedlings failed to emerge on sulfuric acid-treated spent shale. The addition of sulfuric acid to spent shale increased the EC/sub e/ of the shale to over 21 mmhos/cm. Leached and unleached spent shale was fertilized with N at rates of 0, 28, and 56 kg/ha and P at rates of 0, 24.4, and 48.8 kg/ha. The total biomass for any fertilizer treatment was < 1 g. We conclude that covering shale disposal piles with topsoil may improve the site for successful invasion by a colonizing species such as cheatgrass.« less
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  • The spatial distribution of roots of two alien grasses, Bromus tectorum and Poa pratensis, grown singly and in a mixture, was examined using a double-labelling radioisotope technique. Interactions between the root systems of these plants led to a restricted B. tectorum rooting volume in P. pratensis neighborhoods greater than or equal to30-d-old. The roots of B. tectorum failed to develop laterally. The altered B. tectorum root systems may contribute to its inability to persist in established P. pratensis swards.