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Title: STRAIN LOCALIZATION IN IRRADIATED MATERIALS

Abstract

Low temperature irradiation can significantly harden metallic materials and often lead to strain localization and ductility loss in deformation. This paper provides a review on the radiation effects on the deformation of metallic materials, focusing on microscopic and macroscopic strain localization phenomena. The microscopic strain localization often observed in irradiated materials are dislocation channeling and deformation twinning, in which dislocation glides are evenly distributed and well confined in the narrow bands, usually a fraction of a micron wide. Dislocation channeling is a common strain localization mechanism observed virtually in all irradiated metallic materials with ductility, while deformation twinning is an alternative localization mechanism occurring only in low stacking fault energy materials. In some high stacking fault energy materials where cross slip is easy, curved and widening channels can be formed depending on dose and stress state. Irradiation also prompts macroscopic strain localization (or plastic instability). It is shown that the plastic instability stress and true fracture stress are nearly independent of irradiation dose if there is no radiation-induced phase change or embrittlement. A newly proposed plastic instability criterion is that the metals after irradiation show necking at yield when the yield stress exceeds the dose-independent plastic instability stress. There ismore » no evident relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic strain localizations; which is explained by the long-range back-stress hardening. It is proposed that the microscopic strain localization is a generalized phenomenon occurring at high stress.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); High Flux Isotope Reactor; Shared Research Equipment Collaborative Research Center
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1003606
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear Engineering and Technology; Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Radiation Effects; Localized Deformation; Dislocation Channeling; Deformation Twinning; Strain Hardening

Citation Formats

Byun, Thak Sang, and Hashimoto, Naoyuki. STRAIN LOCALIZATION IN IRRADIATED MATERIALS. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Byun, Thak Sang, & Hashimoto, Naoyuki. STRAIN LOCALIZATION IN IRRADIATED MATERIALS. United States.
Byun, Thak Sang, and Hashimoto, Naoyuki. Sun . "STRAIN LOCALIZATION IN IRRADIATED MATERIALS". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1003606,
title = {STRAIN LOCALIZATION IN IRRADIATED MATERIALS},
author = {Byun, Thak Sang and Hashimoto, Naoyuki},
abstractNote = {Low temperature irradiation can significantly harden metallic materials and often lead to strain localization and ductility loss in deformation. This paper provides a review on the radiation effects on the deformation of metallic materials, focusing on microscopic and macroscopic strain localization phenomena. The microscopic strain localization often observed in irradiated materials are dislocation channeling and deformation twinning, in which dislocation glides are evenly distributed and well confined in the narrow bands, usually a fraction of a micron wide. Dislocation channeling is a common strain localization mechanism observed virtually in all irradiated metallic materials with ductility, while deformation twinning is an alternative localization mechanism occurring only in low stacking fault energy materials. In some high stacking fault energy materials where cross slip is easy, curved and widening channels can be formed depending on dose and stress state. Irradiation also prompts macroscopic strain localization (or plastic instability). It is shown that the plastic instability stress and true fracture stress are nearly independent of irradiation dose if there is no radiation-induced phase change or embrittlement. A newly proposed plastic instability criterion is that the metals after irradiation show necking at yield when the yield stress exceeds the dose-independent plastic instability stress. There is no evident relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic strain localizations; which is explained by the long-range back-stress hardening. It is proposed that the microscopic strain localization is a generalized phenomenon occurring at high stress.},
doi = {},
journal = {Nuclear Engineering and Technology},
number = 7,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}