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Title: Crystal structure of HLA-DP2 and implications for chronic beryllium disease

Abstract

Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a fibrotic lung disorder caused by beryllium (Be) exposure and is characterized by granulomatous inflammation and the accumulation of Be-responsive CD4{sup +} T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to CBD has been associated with certain alleles of the MHCII molecule HLA-DP, especially HLA-DPB1*0201 and other alleles that contain a glutamic acid residue at position 69 of the {beta}-chain ({beta}Glu69). The HLA-DP alleles that can present Be to T cells match those implicated in the genetic susceptibility, suggesting that the HLA contribution to disease is based on the ability of those molecules to bind and present Be to T cells. The structure of HLA-DP2 and its interaction with Be are unknown. Here, we present the HLA-DP2 structure with its antigen-binding groove occupied by a self-peptide derived from the HLA-DR {alpha}-chain. The most striking feature of the structure is an unusual solvent exposed acidic pocket formed between the peptide backbone and the HLA-DP2 {beta}-chain {alpha}-helix and containing three glutamic acids from the {beta}-chain, including {beta}Glu69. In the crystal packing, this pocket has been filled with the guanidinium group of an arginine from a neighboring molecule. This positively charged moiety forms an extensive H-bond/salt bridge network withmore » the three glutamic acids, offering a plausible model for how Be-containing complexes might occupy this site. This idea is strengthened by the demonstration that mutation of any of the three glutamic acids in this pocket results in loss of the ability of DP2 to present Be to T cells.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. (HHMI)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1002407
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA; Journal Volume: 107; Journal Issue: (16) ; 04, 2010
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ARGININE; BERYLLIUM; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DISEASES; GENETICS; GLUTAMIC ACID; INFLAMMATION; LUNGS; MUTATIONS; PEPTIDES; RESIDUES; SOLVENTS

Citation Formats

Dai, Shaodong, Murphy, Guinevere A., Crawford, Frances, Mack, Douglas G., Falta, Michael T., Marrack, Philippa, Kappler, John W., Fontenot, Andrew P., and Colorado). Crystal structure of HLA-DP2 and implications for chronic beryllium disease. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1001772107.
Dai, Shaodong, Murphy, Guinevere A., Crawford, Frances, Mack, Douglas G., Falta, Michael T., Marrack, Philippa, Kappler, John W., Fontenot, Andrew P., & Colorado). Crystal structure of HLA-DP2 and implications for chronic beryllium disease. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1001772107.
Dai, Shaodong, Murphy, Guinevere A., Crawford, Frances, Mack, Douglas G., Falta, Michael T., Marrack, Philippa, Kappler, John W., Fontenot, Andrew P., and Colorado). 2010. "Crystal structure of HLA-DP2 and implications for chronic beryllium disease". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1001772107.
@article{osti_1002407,
title = {Crystal structure of HLA-DP2 and implications for chronic beryllium disease},
author = {Dai, Shaodong and Murphy, Guinevere A. and Crawford, Frances and Mack, Douglas G. and Falta, Michael T. and Marrack, Philippa and Kappler, John W. and Fontenot, Andrew P. and Colorado)},
abstractNote = {Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a fibrotic lung disorder caused by beryllium (Be) exposure and is characterized by granulomatous inflammation and the accumulation of Be-responsive CD4{sup +} T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to CBD has been associated with certain alleles of the MHCII molecule HLA-DP, especially HLA-DPB1*0201 and other alleles that contain a glutamic acid residue at position 69 of the {beta}-chain ({beta}Glu69). The HLA-DP alleles that can present Be to T cells match those implicated in the genetic susceptibility, suggesting that the HLA contribution to disease is based on the ability of those molecules to bind and present Be to T cells. The structure of HLA-DP2 and its interaction with Be are unknown. Here, we present the HLA-DP2 structure with its antigen-binding groove occupied by a self-peptide derived from the HLA-DR {alpha}-chain. The most striking feature of the structure is an unusual solvent exposed acidic pocket formed between the peptide backbone and the HLA-DP2 {beta}-chain {alpha}-helix and containing three glutamic acids from the {beta}-chain, including {beta}Glu69. In the crystal packing, this pocket has been filled with the guanidinium group of an arginine from a neighboring molecule. This positively charged moiety forms an extensive H-bond/salt bridge network with the three glutamic acids, offering a plausible model for how Be-containing complexes might occupy this site. This idea is strengthened by the demonstration that mutation of any of the three glutamic acids in this pocket results in loss of the ability of DP2 to present Be to T cells.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1001772107},
journal = {Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA},
number = (16) ; 04, 2010,
volume = 107,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 6
}
  • Five workers at a precious metal refinery developed granulomatous lung disease between 1972 and 1985. The original diagnosis was sarcoidosis, but 4 of the workers were subsequently proved to have hypersensitivity to beryllium by in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. Review of medical records of coworkers and extensive industrial hygiene surveillance of the plant demonstrated that 4 cases occurred in the furnace area where air concentrations of beryllium fume were consistently below the permissible exposure limit of 2 micrograms/M3. A single case has been recognized from parts of the refinery where exposures to cold beryllium dustmore » often exceeded the standard by as much as 20-fold. These data demonstrate that chronic beryllium disease still occurs and confirm the importance of specific immunologic testing in patients suspected of having sarcoidosis but with potential exposure to beryllium. The data raise concern about the adequacy of modern industrial controls, especially in the setting of exposure to highly respirable beryllium fumes.« less
  • With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressing into clinical disease. This article discusses the historical, recent, and ongoing studies germane to our understanding of CBD natural history, including the immunologic and inflammatory basis ofmore » the disease, the environmental and host risk factors for disease progression, biological markers of disease severity and activity that may help predict outcome, and the implications for broad-based workplace screening to identify patients at the earliest stages of beryllium sensitization and disease. 29 refs., 2 figs.« less
  • Beryllium sensitisation (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) are caused by exposure to beryllium with susceptibility affected by at least one well-studied genetic host factor, a glutamic acid residue at position 69 (E69) of the HLA-DPb chain (DPbE69). However, the nature of the relationship between exposure and carriage of the DPbE69 genotype has not been well studied. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between DP{beta}E69 and exposure in BeS and CBD. Current and former workers (n=181) from a US nuclear weapons production facility, the Y-12 National Security Complex (Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA), were enrolled in amore » case-control study including 35 individuals with BeS and 19 with CBD. HLA-DPB1 genotypes were determined by PCR-SSP. Beryllium exposures were assessed through worker interviews and industrial hygiene assessment of work tasks. After removing the confounding effect of potential beryllium exposure at another facility, multivariate models showed a sixfold (OR 6.06, 95% CI 1.96 to 18.7) increased odds for BeS and CBD combined among DP{beta}E69 carriers and a fourfold (OR 3.98, 95% CI 1.43 to 11.0) increased odds for those exposed over an assigned lifetime-weighted average exposure of 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Those with both risk factors had higher increased odds (OR 24.1, 95% CI 4.77 to 122). DP{beta}E69 carriage and high exposure to beryllium appear to contribute individually to the development of BeS and CBD. Among workers at a beryllium-using facility, the magnitude of risk associated with either elevated beryllium exposure or carriage of DP{beta}E69 alone appears to be similar.« less
  • A method using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been developed for quantifying attomoles of beryllium (Be) in biological samples. This method provides the sensitivity to trace Be in biological samples at very low doses with the purpose of identifying the molecular targets involved in chronic beryllium disease. Proof of the method was tested by administering 0.001, 0.05, 0.5 and 5.0 {micro}g {sup 9}Be and {sup 10}Be by intraperitoneal injection to male mice and removing spleen, liver, femurs, blood, lung, and kidneys after 24 h exposure. These samples were prepared for AMS analysis by tissue digestion in nitric acid, followed bymore » further organic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ammonium persulfate and lastly, precipitation of Be with ammonium hydroxide, and conversion to beryllium oxide at 800 C. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio of the extracted beryllium oxide was measured by AMS and Be in the original sample was calculated. Results indicate that Be levels were dose-dependent in all tissues and the highest levels were measured in the spleen and liver. The measured {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios spanned 4 orders of magnitude, from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -14}, with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -14}, which is equivalent to 0.8 attomoles of {sup 10}Be. These results show that routine quantification of nanogram levels of Be in tissues is possible and that AMS is a sensitive method that can be used in biological studies to understand the molecular dosimetry of Be and mechanisms of toxicity.« less