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Creators/Authors contains: "Sumikawa, D.A."
  1. Throughout the history of computers, vision has been the main channel through which information is conveyed to the computer user. As the complexities of man-machine interactions increase, more and more information must be transferred from the computer to the user and then successfully interpreted by the user. A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound and thereby using the sense of ''hearing'' in the computer experience. This allows our visual and auditory capabilities to work naturally together in unison leading to more effective and efficient interpretation of all information received by themore » user from the computer. This thesis presents an initial set of guidelines to assist interface developers in designing an effective sight and sound user interface. This study is a synthesis of various aspects of sound, human communication, computer-user interfaces, and psychoacoustics. We introduce the notion of an earcon. Earcons are audio cues used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about some computer object, operation, or interaction. A possible construction technique for earcons, the use of earcons in the interface, how earcons are learned and remembered, and the affects of earcons on their users are investigated. This study takes the point of view that earcons are a language and human/computer communication issue and are therefore analyzed according to the three dimensions of linguistics; syntactics, semantics, and pragmatics.« less
  2. Earcons are audio cues used in the computer/user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about computer entities. (Earcons include messages and functions, as well as states and labels.) Design guidelines are presented for the syntax of earcons. Earcons are constructed from pitches, rhythms, and motives, short sequences of notes with a specific rhythm and pitch, embellished by timbre, dynamics, and register. Compound earcons and family earcons are introduced. These are related motives that serve to identify a family of related cues. Examples of earcons are given. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.
  3. A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound thereby using our senses of ''hearing'' in our communication with the computer. This allows our visual and auditory capacities to work in unison leading to a more effective and efficient interpretation of information received from the computer than by sight alone. In this paper we examine earcons, which are audio cues, used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about computer entities (these include messages and functions, as well as states and labels). The material in this paper ismore » part of a larger study that recommends guidelines for the design and use of audio cues in the computer-user interface. The complete work examines the disciplines of music, psychology, communication theory, advertising, and psychoacoustics to discover how sound is utilized and analyzed in those areas. The resulting information is organized according to the theory of semiotics, the theory of signs, into the syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of communication by sound. Here we present design guidelines for the syntax of earcons. Earcons are constructed from motives, short sequences of notes with a specific rhythm and pitch, embellished by timbre, dynamics, and register. Compound earcons and family earcons are introduced. These are related motives that serve to identify a family of related cues. Examples of earcons are given.« less
  4. The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is a centralized emergency response service that assesses the consequences that may result from an atmospheric release of toxic material. ARAC was developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Defense (DOD) and responds principally to radiological accidents. ARAC provides radiological health and safety guidance to decision makers in the form of computer-generated estimates of the effects of an actual, or potential release of radioactive material into the atmosphere. Upon receipt of the release scenario, the ARAC assessment staff extracts meteorological, topographic, and geographic data from residentmore » world-wide databases for use in complex, three-dimensional transport and diffusion models. These dispersion models generate air concentration (or dose) and ground deposition contour plots showing estimates of the contamination patterns produced as the toxic material is carried by the prevailing winds. To facilitate the ARAC response to a release from specific DOE and DOD sites and to provide these sites with a local emergency response tool, a remote Site Workstation System (SWS) is being placed at various ARAC-supported facilities across the country.. This SWS replaces the existing antiquated ARAC Site System now installed at many of these sites. The new system gives users access to complex atmospheric dispersion models that may be run either by the ARAC staff at LLNL, or (in a later phase of the system) by site personnel using the computational resources of the SWS. Supporting this primary function are a variety of SWS-resident supplemental capabilities that include meteorological data acquisition, manipulation of release-specific databases, computer-based communications, and the use of a simpler Gaussian trajectory puff model that is based on Environmental Protection Agency`s INPUFF code.« less
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