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Creators/Authors contains: "Shonka, D.B."
  1. Several major areas pertaining to automobile fleet operations in the U.S. are covered. First, all known available sources that contain statistics on fleet vehicles are described. Second, fleet operations in the U.S. are characterized according to stock composition and operational characteristics. Third, properties of fleet cars are compared with those of the total car population, and a comparison is made among fleets used by different sectors. Finally, the significance of fleet operations for transportation energy conservation is discussed.
  2. This document is Supplement II to Edition I of the Transportation Energy Conservation Data Book, EAPA 3:0527, which was published in October, 1976, by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The series of documents is intended to provide a desk-top reference for use by the Transportation Energy Conservation Division of the Energy Research and Development Administration. The supplements contain statistics which update and augment data presented in Edition I. Tables, graphs, and other visuals are used to present statistical data on energy use and related activity of the transportation sector. Data in this supplement concentrate on personal travel characteristics and fuel economymore » options for automobiles. A list of references is provided and an annotated bibliography and glossary is included at the end of this supplement.« less
  3. This is the third edition of the Transportation Energy Conservation Data Book, a statistical compendium compiled and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) Division of the Department of Energy (DOE). Secondary data on transportation characteristics by mode, on transportation energy use, and on other related variables are presented in tabular and/or graphic form. All major modes of transportation are represented: highway, air, rail, marine, and pipeline. The six main chapters focus on various characteristics of the transportation sector including (1) modal characteristics, (2) current energy use, efficiency and conservation, (3) projectionsmore » of modal energy use, (4) impact of government activities, (5) supply and cost of energy, and (6) general demographic and economic characteristics. Included in the more than 400 tables and figures are the following transportation stock and use statistics: number of vehicles, vehicle-miles traveled, passenger-miles and freight ton-miles, fleet characteristics, household automobile ownership, size mix of automobiles, vehicle travel characteristics, and commuting patterns. Energy characteristics presented include energy use by fuel source and transportation mode, energy intensity figures by mode, indirect energy use, production as a percent of consumption, imports as a percent of domestic production, energy prices from the wellhead to the retail outlet, and alternative fuels.« less
  4. The data book represents an assembly and display of statistics that characterize transportation activity and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this publication is to present a large amount of relevant data in an easily retrievable and usable format with the statistical data shown in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major tansportation modes (highway, air, rail, and pipeline) is treated in separate chapters or sections, although aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chap. 1. The highway mode, accounting for over 77% ofmore » total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chap. 2. Topics in this chapter include vehicle stock characteristics, fuel efficiency, household vehicle ownership and use, fleet automobiles, buses, and trucks. Chap. 3 presents data on each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively. The final chapter, Chap. 4, summarizes historical trends in transportation activity.« less
  5. Separate abstracts are prepared for the six main chapters on the various characteristics of the transportation sector. Chapter 7 provides the compilation of reference materials, and additionally, sections are devoted to a glossary, keyword index, and permuted-title index. (MCW)
  6. This document is the fourth in a series of supplements to ORNL-5198, Transportation Energy Conservation Data Book: Edition I (EAPA 3:527). The Data Book series is being compiled and published by ORNL under contract with the Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) Division of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). Data on transportation characteristics, energy consumption, and other related variables are presented in tabular or graphic form. For the user's reference, a glossary, a bibliography, energy conversion factors, and an index to information presented in Supplement IV are provided. Some of the specific items presented on transportation modal characteristics include fleetmore » vehicular stock data, automobile choice and ownership characteristics, information describing commuting and long distance travel patterns, new car sales by market segment, electric vehicle production, and statistics on bicycle stock and usage. Transportation energy demand projections in general, and in detail for the marine sector, are presented, as well as sales-weighted miles per gallon figures by weight of automobile, model year, and automobile producer. Other transportation-related information included in Supplement IV are a graphic presentation of President Carter's tax-rebate schedule, a comparison of the nominal and real price of gasoline, and a descriptive list of the current safety standards. Finally, detailed data on the US total population and its migration patterns are presented. The second edition of the TEC Data Book will update and integrate the information provided in Edition I and the Supplements. The planned date of publication for this document is October, 1977.« less
  7. This document is Supplement I to Edition I of the Transportation Energy Conservation Data Book, ORNL-5198, which was published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in October 1976. The first edition and this supplement are intended to provide a desk-top reference for use by the Transportation Energy Conservation Division of the Energy Research and Development Administration. This supplement contains statistics which update and augment data presented in Edition I. A variety of tables, charts, maps, and graphs are used in this volume to present statistical data on energy use and energy related activity through the following topics: (1) Characteristics of Transportationmore » Modes including information on Air, Rail, Water Vessels, and Pipelines; (2) Energy Characteristics including information on Energy Consumption and Energy Intensity; (3) Government Impacts and Government Regulations. A list of references is provided at the end of each chapter supplement, and an annotated bibliography and glossary are included at the end of the supplement. In particular, nonhighway transportation activities received less emphasis than highway activities in Edition I. Therefore, this supplement presents additional data in this area. Also, detailed data on fuel consumption and energy intensiveness of the various modes is included in this document. Periodic updates will ensure the availability of recently released data.« less
  8. Trends in transportation energy use by mode from 1973 to 1980 are described and analyzed. Declines in energy use in 1973-74 and again in 1979-80 were largely the result of short-run price effect. Together these factors accounted for two-thirds to three-quarters of the decline in energy use in either episode. Declines in energy use resulting from technical efficiency improvements were less significant. Technological improvements in the fuel economy of new cars and light trucks in 1980 probably accounted for 25% of the decline in highway gasoline use between 1979 and 1980, and increased use of more-efficient wide-body jets accounted formore » some of the decline in aircraft energy intensity between 1973 and 1980. Data for other modes indicate little or no technological improvement in stock fuel efficiency partly because of lesser incentives and slower capital stock turnover rates. Highway gasoline use is analyzed first, followed by highway diesel fuel use. Analyses of use by the air and rail modes follow. Brief discussions of pipeline and marine energy use are presented. (MCW)« less
  9. This is the fourth edition of the Transportation Energy Conservation Data Book, a statistical compendium compiled and published by ORNL for DOE. Secondary data on transportation characteristics by mode, on transportation energy use, and on other related variables are presented in tabular and/or graphic form. All major modes of transportation are represented: highway, air, rail, marine, and pipeline. The six main chapters focus on various characteristics of the transportation sector including (1) modal characteristics, (2) current energy use, efficiency and conservation, (3) projections of modal energy use, (4) impact of government activities, (5) supply and cost of energy, and (6)more » general demographic and economic characteristics. Included in the tables and figures are the following transportation stock and use statistics: number of vehicles, vehicle-miles traveled, passenger-miles and freight ton-miles, fleet characteristics, household automobile ownership, size mix of automobiles, vehicle travel characteristics, and commuting patterns. Energy characteristics presented include energy use by fuel source and transportation mode, energy intensity figures by mode, indirect energy use, production as a percent of consumption, imports as a percent of domestic production, energy prices from the wellhead to the retail outlet, and alternative fuels.« less
  10. This document seeks to highlight regional differences in characteristics affecting transportation energy conservation in the US. The basic energy use data are presented in five modal chapters: highway, air, rail, marine, and pipeline. Each chapter contains information on stock of vehicles, transport networks, vehicle use, fuel use, and related data. Within modal chapters, data are presented at three levels of spatial disaggregation: selected metropolitan areas, states, and the 10 federal regions. Socioeconomic factors are considered relevant to transportation demand, focusing on the household as the basic consuming unit. Energy supply and aggregate energy use for states are considered. United Statesmore » energy use in transportation is placed in a world regional perspective. The Regional Data Book is a companion to the Transportation Energy Conservation Data Book which provides data at the national level.« less
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