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Creators/Authors contains: "Motloch, C.G."
  1. This report describes progress made at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during the first three quarters of Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 on the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to perform preliminary design studies on the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). This work builds on the FY-92 BATR studies, which identified anticipated mission and safety requirements for BATR and assessed a variety of reactor concepts for their potential capability to meet those requirements. The main accomplishment of the FY-92 BATR program is the development of baseline reactor configurations for the two conventional conceptual test reactors recommended in the FY-91 report.more » Much of the present report consists of descriptions and neutronics and thermohydraulics analyses of these baseline configurations. In addition, we considered reactor safety issues, compared the consequences of steam explosions for alternative conventional fuel types, explored a Molten Chloride Fast Reactor concept as an alternate BATR design, and examined strategies for the reduction of operating costs. Work planned for the last quarter of FY-92 is discussed, and recommendations for future work are also presented.« less
  2. A Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) is needed to provide nuclear testing capacity and capability for future testing needs. The BATR concept is expected to consider a broad range of test applications. The present day costs of design and construction of new nuclear facilities demands that methods, processes, and requirements be critically reviewed and improved if these facilities are to be affordable in the future. The cost of major new projects in this country has been escalating faster than the rate of inflation. For example, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a reactor built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)more » in the early sixties, cost about $38M in 1960 dollars. Estimates to build that same reactor today range as high as $1B. Although somewhat different in mission, but in many respects comparable to theATR in function, size, and complexity, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is currently estimated to cost about $2B for design and construction. This report presents cost concerns, cost reduction ideas, and recommendations that were identified and developed by the Cost Reduction Study Team for consideration by the BATR Design Team.« less
  3. A Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) is needed to provide nuclear testing capacity and capability for future testing needs. The BATR concept is expected to consider a broad range of test applications. The present day costs of design and construction of new nuclear facilities demands that methods, processes, and requirements be critically reviewed and improved if these facilities are to be affordable in the future. The cost of major new projects in this country has been escalating faster than the rate of inflation. For example, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a reactor built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)more » in the early sixties, cost about $38M in 1960 dollars. Estimates to build that same reactor today range as high as $1B. Although somewhat different in mission, but in many respects comparable to theATR in function, size, and complexity, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is currently estimated to cost about $2B for design and construction. This report presents cost concerns, cost reduction ideas, and recommendations that were identified and developed by the Cost Reduction Study Team for consideration by the BATR Design Team.« less
  4. This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), includes an indication of the magnitude of facility hazards, complexity of facility operations, and the stage of the facility life-cycle. It presents the results of safety analyses, safety assurance programs, identified vulnerabilities, compensatory measures, and, in general, the rationale describing why the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) can be safely operated. It discusses application of the graded approach to the TPX safety analysis, including the basis for using Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94 in the development of the PSAR.
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