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Creators/Authors contains: "Kulp, G."
  1. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics that characterize transportation activity and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this publication is to present a large amount of relevant data in an easily retrievable and usable format with the statistical data shown in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes (highway, air, water, rail, and pipeline) is treated separately, and aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented. The highway mode, accounting for over 77%more » of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with. Topics in this include vehicle stock characteristics, fuel efficiency, household vehicle ownership and use, fleet automobiles, buses, and trucks. Data are presented on each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively. Trends in vehicle and engine characteristics related to fuel economy are summarized. Emphasis is placed on vehicles and engines for highway use.« less
  2. The design, implementation, and results of a carpool and vanpool evaluation are described. Objectives of the evaluation were: to develop credible estimates of the energy savings attributable to the ridesharing program, to provide information for improving the performance of the ridesharing program, and to add to a general understanding of the ridesharing process. Previous evaluation work is critiqued and the research methodology adopted for this study is discussed. The ridesharing program in Michigan is described and the basis for selecting Michigan as the evaluation site is discussed. The evaluation methodology is presented, including research design, sampling procedure, data collection, andmore » data validation. Evaluation results are analyzed. (LEW)« less
  3. The data book represents an assembly and display of statistics that characterize transportation activity and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this publication is to present a large amount of relevant data in an easily retrievable and usable format with the statistical data shown in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major tansportation modes (highway, air, rail, and pipeline) is treated in separate chapters or sections, although aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chap. 1. The highway mode, accounting for over 77% ofmore » total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chap. 2. Topics in this chapter include vehicle stock characteristics, fuel efficiency, household vehicle ownership and use, fleet automobiles, buses, and trucks. Chap. 3 presents data on each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively. The final chapter, Chap. 4, summarizes historical trends in transportation activity.« less
  4. Trends in transportation energy use by mode from 1973 to 1980 are described and analyzed. Declines in energy use in 1973-74 and again in 1979-80 were largely the result of short-run price effect. Together these factors accounted for two-thirds to three-quarters of the decline in energy use in either episode. Declines in energy use resulting from technical efficiency improvements were less significant. Technological improvements in the fuel economy of new cars and light trucks in 1980 probably accounted for 25% of the decline in highway gasoline use between 1979 and 1980, and increased use of more-efficient wide-body jets accounted formore » some of the decline in aircraft energy intensity between 1973 and 1980. Data for other modes indicate little or no technological improvement in stock fuel efficiency partly because of lesser incentives and slower capital stock turnover rates. Highway gasoline use is analyzed first, followed by highway diesel fuel use. Analyses of use by the air and rail modes follow. Brief discussions of pipeline and marine energy use are presented. (MCW)« less
  5. This is the fourth edition of the Transportation Energy Conservation Data Book, a statistical compendium compiled and published by ORNL for DOE. Secondary data on transportation characteristics by mode, on transportation energy use, and on other related variables are presented in tabular and/or graphic form. All major modes of transportation are represented: highway, air, rail, marine, and pipeline. The six main chapters focus on various characteristics of the transportation sector including (1) modal characteristics, (2) current energy use, efficiency and conservation, (3) projections of modal energy use, (4) impact of government activities, (5) supply and cost of energy, and (6)more » general demographic and economic characteristics. Included in the tables and figures are the following transportation stock and use statistics: number of vehicles, vehicle-miles traveled, passenger-miles and freight ton-miles, fleet characteristics, household automobile ownership, size mix of automobiles, vehicle travel characteristics, and commuting patterns. Energy characteristics presented include energy use by fuel source and transportation mode, energy intensity figures by mode, indirect energy use, production as a percent of consumption, imports as a percent of domestic production, energy prices from the wellhead to the retail outlet, and alternative fuels.« less
  6. Regional variation among selected factors affecting energy use in highway transportation is described and analyzed. Highway vehicle use accounts for about 95% of all motor gasoline used and a substantial portion of the diesel fuel consumed in the US. For the purposes of analysis, highway energy use can be divided into three sectoral users: household, commercial, and government. Chapter 1, Nonhighway Use of Gasoline, covers agriculture, marine, aviation, industrial and commercial, construction, snowmobiles, and motorcycles. Chapter 2, Topics in Commercial Highway Energy Use, includes the following: Commercial Use of Gasoline in Highway Transportation, Automotive Fleets and Electric Vehicle Applicability; Localmore » and Short-Haul Commercial Trucking; Intercity Trucking; and Intracity Bus Service. Chapter 3, Selected Characteristics of Highway Energy Use by the Household Sector, includes sections entitled: Regional Gasoline Use; Ownership of New and Used Vehicles; Fuel Efficiencies and Market Shares of New Vehicle Registrations; Regional Trends in Import Passenger Car Sales and in Light Truck and Van Sales; Regional Variations in Recreational Vehicle Shipments and in Gasoline Consumption, 1977; Regional Patterns of Motorcycle and Moped Use; and An Analysis of the Differences in Carpooling Across Metropolitan Areas.« less
  7. Between 1973 and 1980, U.S. energy use grew at an average annual rate that was only one-tenth the pre-embargo rate. This dramatic change in energy growth was caused by a combination of rapidly rising fuel prices, slower economic growth, occasional shortages of fuels, and government and utility conservation programs. This paper examines the post-embargo period in terms of energy use in each of the major sectors: residential and commercial buildings, transportation, and industry. The analysis deals with two issues: what changes occurred in energy use during this period relative to pre-embargo trends and why these changes occurred. Energy use inmore » 1980 (76 quads) was about 20 quads lower than pre-embargo trends would suggest. About half of this reduction was due to slower growth in economic activity. The remainder was due to improvements in energy efficiency, spurred primarily by rising fuel prices and also by government and utility conservation programs. The 1980 increase in overall energy efficiency (10 quads) was due primarily to technical efficiency improvements and secondarily to operational changes.« less
  8. Between 1973 and 1980 US energy use grew at an average annual rate that was only one-tenth the pre-embargo growth rate. This sudden and dramatic change in energy growth was caused by a combination of rapidly rising fuel prices, slower economic growth, occasional shortages of fuels, and government and utility conservation programs. This report examines the post-embargo period in terms of energy use in each of the major sectors: residential and commercial buildings, transportation, and industry. The analysis deals with two issues: what changes occurred in energy use during this period relative to pre-embargo trends, and why these changes occurred.more » Energy use in 1980 (76 Quads) was substantially lower than pre-embargo trends would suggest (by roughly 20 Quads). About half of this 20 Quad reduction was due to slower growth in economic activity. The remainder was due to improvements in energy efficiency, spurred primarily by rising fuel prices and also by government and utility conservation programs. The 1980 increase in overall energy efficiency (ten Quads) was due primarily to technical efficiency improvements (60%) and secondarily to operational changes (40%).« less
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