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Title: The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects

Geologic carbon sequestration is the injection of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} into deep geologic formations where the CO{sub 2} is intended to remain indefinitely. If successfully implemented, geologic carbon sequestration will have little or no impact on terrestrial ecosystems aside from the mitigation of climate change. However, failure of a geologic carbon sequestration site, such as large-scale leakage of CO{sub 2} into a potable groundwater aquifer, could cause impacts that would require costly remediation measures. Governments are attempting to develop regulations for permitting geologic carbon sequestration sites to ensure their safety and effectiveness. At present, these regulations focus largely on decreasing the probability of failure. In this paper we propose that regulations for the siting of early geologic carbon sequestration projects should emphasize limiting the consequences of failure because consequences are easier to quantify than failure probability.
Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
962724
Report Number(s):
LBNL-2051E
TRN: US200916%%356
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
Earth Sciences Division
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; 58; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; CLIMATES; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS; MITIGATION; PROBABILITY; REGULATIONS; SAFETY; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS