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Title: Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
912465
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-07-12519
TRN: US200801%%895
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Idaho Academy of Science,University Place, Idaho Falls,04/19/2007,04/21/2007
Research Org:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org:
DOE - NE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ARCHITECTURE; CLASSIFICATION; DESERTS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; SNAKE RIVER PLAIN archaeology; hunting and gathering; prehistoric rock structures