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Title: Pulsed Drift Tube Accelerator

The pulsed drift-tube accelerator (DTA) concept was revived by Joe Kwan and John Staples and is being considered for the HEDP/WDM application. It could be used to reach the full energy or as an intermediate accelerator between the diode and a high gradient accelerator such as multi-beam r.f. In the earliest LBNL HIF proposals and conceptual drivers it was used as an extended injector to reach energies where an induction linac with magnetic quadrupoles is the best choice. For HEDP, because of the very short pulse duration, the DTA could provide an acceleration rate of about 1MV/m. This note is divided into two parts: the first, a design based on existing experience; the second, an optimistic extrapolation. The first accelerates 16 parallel K{sup +} beams at a constant line charge density of 0.25{micro} C/m per beam to 10 MeV; the second uses a stripper and charge selector at around 4MeV followed by further acceleration to reach 40 MeV. Both benefit from more compact sources than the present 2MV injector source, although that beam is the basis of the first design and is a viable option. A pulsed drift-tube accelerator was the first major HIF experiment at LBNL. It was designedmore » to produce a 2{micro}s rectangular 1 Ampere C{sub s}{sup +} beam at 2MeV. It ran comfortably at 1.6MeV for several years, then at lower voltages and currents for other experiments, and remnants of that experiment are in use in present experiments, still running 25 years later. The 1A current, completely equivalent to 1.8A K{sup +}, was chosen to be intermediate between the beamlets appropriate for a multi-beam accelerator, and a single beam of, say, 10A, at injection energies. The original driver scenarios using one large beam on each side of the reactor rapidly fell out of favor because of the very high transverse and longitudinal fields from the beam space charge, circa 1MV/cm and 250 kV/cm respectively, near the chamber and because of aberrations in focusing a large diameter beam down to a 1mm radius spot at a distance of 10m. Almost all subsequent work and the present concept have invoked multiple beams. For HEDP the major differences are that the focal distance can be centimeters instead of meters, provided strong-enough lenses exist and they do, thereby allowing much higher transverse and longitudinal emittances than driver concepts, and focusing parallel small beams is easier than one big beam.« less
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
861362
Report Number(s):
LBNL--59065; HIFAN 1512
R&D Project: Z41003; BnR: AT5015031; TRN: US0600318
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Research Org:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of Fusion EnergySciences
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ACCELERATION; ACCELERATORS; CHARGE DENSITY; DESIGN; DRIFT TUBES; EXTRAPOLATION; FOCUSING; INDUCTION; LENSES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; METERS; QUADRUPOLES; SPACE CHARGE