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Title: Drama in Dynamics: Boom, Splash, and Speed

The full nature of chemistry and physics cannot be captured by static calculations alone. Dynamics calculations allow the simulation of time-dependent phenomena. This facilitates both comparisons with experimental data and the prediction and interpretation of details not easily obtainable from experiments. Simulations thus provide a direct link between theory and experiment, between microscopic details of a system and macroscopic observed properties. Many types of dynamics calculations exist. The most important distinction between the methods and the decision of which method to use can be described in terms of the size and type of molecule/reaction under consideration and the type and level of accuracy required in the final properties of interest. These considerations must be balanced with available computational codes and resources as simulations to mimic ''real-life'' may require many time steps. As indicated in the title, the theme of this thesis is dynamics. The goal is to utilize the best type of dynamics for the system under study while trying to perform dynamics in the most accurate way possible. As a quantum chemist, this involves some level of first principles calculations by default. Very accurate calculations of small molecules and molecular systems are now possible with relatively high-level ab initiomore » quantum chemistry. For example, a quantum chemical potential energy surface (PES) can be developed ''on-the-fly'' with dynamic reaction path (DRP) methods. In this way a classical trajectory is developed without prior knowledge of the PES. In order to treat solvation processes and the condensed phase, large numbers of molecules are required, especially in predicting bulk behavior. The Effective Fragment Potential (EFP) method for solvation decreases the cost of a fully quantum mechanical calculation by dividing a chemical system into an ab initio region that contains the solute and an ''effective fragment'' region that contains the remaining solvent molecules. But, despite the reduced cost relative to fully QM calculations, the EFP method, due to its complex, QM-based potential, does require more computation time than simple interaction potentials, especially when the method is used for large scale molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, the EFP method was parallelized to facilitate these calculations within the quantum chemistry program GAMESS. The EFP method provides relative energies and structures that are in excellent agreement with the analogous fully quantum results for small water clusters. The ability of the method to predict bulk water properties with a comparable accuracy is assessed by performing EFP molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide properties that are directly comparable with experimental results, for example radial distribution functions. The molecular PES is a fundamental starting point for chemical reaction dynamics. Many methods can be used to obtain a PES; for example, assuming a global functional form for the PES or, as mentioned above, performing ''on-the-fly'' dynamics with Al or semi-empirical calculations at every molecular configuration. But as the size of the system grows, using electronic structure theory to build a PES and, therefore, study reaction dynamics becomes virtually impossible. The program Grow builds a PES as an interpolation of Al data; the goal is to attempt to produce an accurate PES with the smallest number of Al calculations. The Grow-GAMESS interface was developed to obtain the Al data from GAMESS. Classical or quantum dynamics can be performed on the resulting surface. The interface includes the novel capability to build multi-reference PESs; these types of calculations are applicable to problems ranging from atmospheric chemistry to photochemical reaction mechanisms in organic and inorganic chemistry to fundamental biological phenomena such as photosynthesis.« less
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
835377
Report Number(s):
IS--T 1930
TRN: US200501%%261
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-Eng-82
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 19 Dec 2004
Research Org:
Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CONFIGURATION; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; FORECASTING; FUNCTIONALS; INTERPOLATION; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; POTENTIAL ENERGY; SOLUTES; SOLVATION; SOLVENTS; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; VELOCITY