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Title: CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION BY MECHANOCHEMICAL CARBONATION OF MINERAL SILICATES

The University of Utah and the University of Idaho investigated the carbonation of silicate minerals by mechanochemical processing. This method uses intense grinding, and has the potential of being much less expensive than other methods of mineral sequestration. Tests were conducted in three types of grinding devices. In these tests, natural and synthetic silicate compounds were ground for varying times in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. A significant change takes place in the lizardite variety of serpentine after 15 to 20 minutes of intense grinding in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of lizardite thus treated was much different than that of the untreated mineral. This spectrum could not be identified as that of any natural or synthetic material. Laboratory analyses showed that small amounts of carbon are fixed by grinding lizardite, forsterite, and wollastonite (all naturally-occurring minerals), and synthetic magnesium silicate, in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. It was thus concluded that further investigation was warranted, and a follow-up proposal was submitted to the Department of Energy under solicitation number.
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
826304
DOE Contract Number:
FG26-02NT41547
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Apr 2004
Research Org:
University of Utah (US)
Sponsoring Org:
(US)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; GRINDING; IDAHO; MAGNESIUM SILICATES; PROCESSING; SERPENTINE; SILICATE MINERALS; SILICATES; SYNTHETIC MATERIALS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION