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Title: Consequences of landscape patterns on the genetic composition of remnant hardwood stands in the Southeast: A pilot study.

Report of a pilot study intended to generate genetic data for a tree species in fragmented hardwood stands. It was anticipated that this data would permit assessment of the feasibility of long-term genetic research for which external funding support could be generated. A second objective was to initiate studies that addressed fundamental questions of how landscape structure, in conjunction with the population dynamics and reproductive characteristics of the tree species, influences genetic structure and long-term viability of hardwood forest stands on the Savannah River Site and in similar southeastern landscapes. Fragmentation of plant habitats can result in small, genetically isolated populations. Spatial isolation and small population size may have several consequences, including reduced reproduction, increased inbreeding and the stochastic loss of genetic variability. Such losses of genetic and genotypic diversity can reduce plant fitness and may diminish population viability. Deleterious genetic effects resulting from small population sizes can be ameliorated by gene flow via pollen and seed into fragmented populations.
Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
819832
Report Number(s):
na
03-10-R; TRN: US200706%%675
DOE Contract Number:
AI09-00SR22188
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Research Org:
USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM);
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; FORESTS; FRAGMENTATION; GENES; GENETIC EFFECTS; GENETIC VARIABILITY; GENETICS; POLLEN; POPULATION DYNAMICS; REPRODUCTION; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; SEEDS; TREES; VIABILITY Fragmentation; genetic isolation; Landscape structure; Genetic structure.