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Title: Fusion Power Deployment

Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.
Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
796123
Report Number(s):
PPPL-3669.pdf
TRN: US0201452
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH03073
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 6 Feb 2002
Research Org:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (US)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (US)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; AVAILABILITY; BIOMASS; CARBON DIOXIDE; DISTRIBUTION; ENERGY STORAGE; ENERGY SUPPLIES; FISSION; IMPACT FUSION; POWER PLANTS; POWER TRANSMISSION; PRODUCTION; WASTES