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Title: Growth, nutrient absorption, and moisture status of selected woody species in coal-mine spoil in response to an induced infection by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius

In this study, nursery grown loblolly and Virginia pine seedlings infected with Pisolithus and control seedlings were outplanted on a coal mine spoil in Tennessee which had been previously hydroseeded. Granular fertilizer was applied by broadcasting to one-half of the seedlings of each ectomycorrhizal treatment at the rate of 112 kg/ha NPK. After 3 years, the survival and growth of loblolly pine infected with Pisolithus were superior to that of the control seedlings, and chemical analyses of foliar samples revealed that the seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae had a higher foliar concentration of NO/sub 3/ and a lower concentration of Zn than the control seedlings. The survival, growth, and nutrient absorption of Virginia pine were not significantly affected by the infection with Pisolithus after 2 years, but both loblolly and Virginia pine seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae exhibited an enhanced ability to absorb water during periods of high moisture stress, as determined by the pressure chamber technique. Fertilization substantially reduced the survival of the seedlings of both species. Sweet birch and European alder were grown under high, intermediate, and low fertility regimes in sand culture containing a mycelial inoculum of Pisolithus tinctorius for 5 months and then transplanted to coal mine spoilmore » containing an identical Pisolithus inoculum. Control seedlings of each species were similarly grown except that no inoculum was incorporated into the potting media. The nutrient treatments initiated in the sand culture were continued throughout the study. Examinations of the roots of the sweet birch seedlings revealed that high fertility significantly reduced the development of Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae, but Pisolithus formed abundant ectomycorrhizae on the roots of sweet birch grown under the intermediate and low fertility regimes and these seedlings were significantly larger than comparable control seedlings.« less
Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7056728
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-8359
ON: DE83000377
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis. Submitted to University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; BIRCHES; PLANT GROWTH; COAL MINES; REVEGETATION; PINES; ADSORPTION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; FERTILIZATION; FUNGAL DISEASES; GROUND COVER; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; MOISTURE; NITRATES; NUTRIENTS; SEEDLINGS; SPOIL BANKS; TENNESSEE; TREES; UPTAKE; ZINC; CONIFERS; DATA; DISEASES; ELEMENTS; FEDERAL REGION IV; GROWTH; INFORMATION; METALS; MINES; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NORTH AMERICA; NUMERICAL DATA; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PLANTS; SORPTION; UNDERGROUND FACILITIES; USA 510500* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Site Resource & Use Studies-- (-1989); 010900 -- Coal, Lignite, & Peat-- Environmental Aspects