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Title: Demographic history of an English coal-mining parish: Houghton-le-Spring, County Durham, 1660-1820

In 1666 the size of the population of Houghton-le-Spring was 2332. By 1821, the population had grown to 12,889 persons. The population of the village grew primarily due to increasing fertility during the period. The Total Martial Fertility Ratio (20-49) increased from 6.98 to 8.37 between the late seventeenth and the early nineteenth centuries. The mean age at first marriage for brides and grooms declined on average by three years. During the 160 years of the study the level of mortality actually increased. In the parish of Houghton-le-Spring, the coal miners, who were prime examples of proletarians, did marry much younger than a person engaged in the traditional occupations. Thus, the primary cause of the increasing level of fertility in the parish was the process of proletarianization. The study of mortality revealed that coal miners and their dependents suffered higher rates of mortality than persons in other occupations. These higher rates were partly caused by a greater incidence of deaths due to mining accidents. The population proved to be surprisingly immobile. Approximately 90% of the population lived their entire life within fifteen miles of their place of birth. This was true of all occupational groups.
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7054391
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph. D.)
Publisher:
Ohio State Univ.,Columbus, OH
Research Org:
Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; COAL INDUSTRY; DEMOGRAPHY; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; RURAL AREAS; UNITED KINGDOM; INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS; MORTALITY; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; ACCIDENTS; EUROPE; INDUSTRY; WESTERN EUROPE 010900* -- Coal, Lignite, & Peat-- Environmental Aspects; 294001 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Coal; 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology