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Title: Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6565562
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Corrosion (Houston); (USA); Journal Volume: 46:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; PIPELINES; STRESS CORROSION; STEELS; CRACK PROPAGATION; CREEP; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; FORECASTING; HIGH PRESSURE; PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS; PRESSURE VESSELS; RELIABILITY; STRAIN HARDENING; STRESS ANALYSIS; ALLOYS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CONTAINERS; CORROSION; HARDENING; IRON ALLOYS; IRON BASE ALLOYS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 360105* -- Metals & Alloys-- Corrosion & Erosion; 360103 -- Metals & Alloys-- Mechanical Properties; 420205 -- Engineering-- Transport & Storage Facilities-- (1980-)