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Title: Insects in relation to black locust culture on surface-mine spoil in Kentucky, with emphasis on the locust twig borer, Ecdytolopha insiticiana Zell. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

This research evaluated the impacts of herbivorous insects, emphasizing the locust twig borer, Ecdytolopha insiticiana Zeller, on black locust, Robinia pseudoacacia L., coppice production on a coal surface-mine spoil site in southeastern Kentucky. The natural history of E. insiticiana was also studied. The locust twig borer was a persistent and damaging pest in first-year coppice, which provided suitable larval habitat throughout the growing season. The locust leafminer, Odontota dorsalis (Thunberg), fed minimally on first-year coppice foliage except during 1983, when trees were severely drought-stressed. Soil-applied granular carbofuran significantly reduced infestations. Lindane stem treatments were not effective, but entire-tree applications did reduce herbivory. Stump sprouts with reduced levels of herbivory grew significantly taller than controls at both spacings in 1983, but only at the more dense spacing in 1984. Blacklight trap collections revealed two generations/year, and adults were present from early May until late August. Four species of hymenopterous and two species of dipterous parasitoids were recovered from E. insiticiana larvae.
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6551566
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph. D.)
Publisher:
Univ. of Kentucky,Lexington, KY
Research Org:
Kentucky Univ., Lexington (USA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; INSECTS; ECOLOGY; SPOIL BANKS; LAND RECLAMATION; COAL MINING; COPPICES; HERBICIDES; HYMENOPTERA; KENTUCKY; LEPIDOPTERA; SURFACE MINING; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; FEDERAL REGION IV; FORESTS; INVERTEBRATES; MINING; NORTH AMERICA; PESTICIDES; USA 510500* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Site Resource & Use Studies-- (-1989); 010900 -- Coal, Lignite, & Peat-- Environmental Aspects