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Title: Plastic pipe insertion

In March 1987 KPL changed all that when the utility inserted 1,000 ft of 16-in. SDR 15.5 Phillips Driscopipe 8000 pipe with a wall thickness of 1.032-in., into an abandoned 24-in. cast-iron line in downtown Kansas City. This is believed to be the largest diameter insert removal job ever done for gas distribution in the U.S. For KPL it was a natural progression from the smaller sizes used earlier. The procedure is the same, and the operation was quick and comparatively simple. Lower construction costs were the bottom line because with insert renewal there is no need to cut up the streets, a major expense in any urban pipeline work. There are other significant costs savings as well because the insert renewal construction process is faster than other techniques.
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6441206
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Pipeline Gas J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 214:5
Research Org:
District Superintendent, KPL Gas Service, Kansas City, MO
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 42 ENGINEERING; NATURAL GAS; TRANSPORT; NATURAL GAS DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS; PIPELINES; LINERS; MATERIALS; CAPITALIZED COST; CAST IRON; CONSTRUCTION; GAS UTILITIES; INSTALLATION; MISSOURI; PIPE FITTINGS; PLASTICS; URBAN AREAS; ALLOYS; CARBIDES; CARBON COMPOUNDS; COST; ENERGY SOURCES; ENERGY SYSTEMS; FEDERAL REGION VII; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; IRON ALLOYS; IRON BASE ALLOYS; IRON CARBIDES; IRON COMPOUNDS; NORTH AMERICA; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PUBLIC UTILITIES; SYNTHETIC MATERIALS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; USA 032000* -- Natural Gas-- Transport, Handling, & Storage; 420205 -- Engineering-- Transport & Storage Facilities-- (1980-)