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Title: The observed relationship between the occurrence of acute radiation effects and leukemia mortality among A-bomb survivors

In an analysis of a follow-up study of a fixed population of 73,330 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the slope of an estimated dose response between ionizing radiation and leukemia mortality was found to be steeper (P less than 0.002), by a factor of 2.4, among those who reported epilation within 60 days of the bombings, compared to those who did not experience this sign of acute radiation exposure. The strength of this empirical finding as evidence of biological association in individual radiosensitivity for these two end points is studied here. The major factor complicating the interpretation of this finding as evidence of such an association is the degree of imprecision of the radiation dosimetry system used in assignment of radiation doses to the A-bomb survivors. Using models recently suggested for dealing with dosimetry errors in epidemiological analysis of the A-bomb survivor data, the sensitivity of the apparent association between leukemia mortality and severe epilation to the assumed level of dosimetry error is investigated.
Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5891478
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiation Research; (USA); Journal Volume: 125:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; A-BOMB SURVIVORS; MORTALITY; DOSIMETRY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; LEUKEMIA; RADIOINDUCTION; ACUTE EXPOSURE; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; DATA COVARIANCES; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; HIROSHIMA; IONIZING RADIATIONS; NAGASAKI; RADIATION INJURIES; ASIA; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; DISEASES; HEMIC DISEASES; HUMAN POPULATIONS; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; INJURIES; JAPAN; NEOPLASMS; POPULATIONS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS 560151* -- Radiation Effects on Animals-- Man