skip to main content

Title: Combining mariculture and seawater-based solar ponds

Solar ponds have been thoroughly studied as a means to produce electricity or heat, but there may be comparable potential to use solar ponds to produce optimized environments for the cultivation of some aquaculture crops. For this, conventional brine-based solar ponds could be used. This strategy would probably be most suitable at desert sites where concentrated brine was abundant, pond liners might not be needed, and the crop produced could be shipped to market. Generally, a heat exchanger would be required to transfer heat from the solar pond into the culture ponds. Culture ponds could therefore use either fresh or marine water. In contrast, this paper explores seawater-based solar ponds. These are solar ponds which use seawater in the bottom storage zone and fresh water in the upper convective zone. Because the required temperature elevations for mariculture are only about 10{degrees}C, seawater-based solar ponds are conceivable. Seawater-based ponds should be very inexpensive because, by the shore, salt costs would be negligible and a liner might be unnecessary.
Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (San Diego State Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5877609
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solar Energy Engineering; (USA); Journal Volume: 112:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; AQUACULTURE; SOLAR PROCESS HEAT; SOLAR PONDS; DESIGN; PERFORMANCE; SEAWATER; ENERGY; EQUIPMENT; HEAT; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PONDS; PROCESS HEAT; SOLAR COLLECTORS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; SURFACE WATERS; WATER 141000* -- Solar Collectors & Concentrators; 140905