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Title: Description and operation of Haakon School geothermal heating system

Haakon School is located in the city of Philip, near the Badlands National Park in the southwest quadrant of South Dakota. The town overlies the Madison Formation which is a large-area aquifer. The aquifer has a demonstrated capability to produce geothermal water. A system to tap this potential and heat the Haakon School District buildings in Philip has been in operation since November 1980. Five school buildings having a total area of 44,000 ft{sup 2} (4088 ft{sup 2}) are heated with 157{degrees}F (69{degrees}C) water. A single well provides water at a maximum artesian flow of 340 gpm (21.5 L/s), which more than meets the heat demand of the school buildings. Eight buildings in the Philip business district utilize geothermal fluid discharged from the school for space heating. During the 1980-81 heating season, these buildings obtained 75% to 90% of their heat from geothermal fluid. Peak heat delivery of the system is 5.5 million Btu/h (1.61. MJ/s), with an annual energy delivery of 9.5 billion Btu (10 TJ). The geothermal system has operated nearly problem free with the exception of the equipment to remove Radium-226 from the spent fluid. Barium chloride is added to the water to precipitate sulfates containing themore » radium. Accumulation of precipitates in piping has caused some operational problems.« less
Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
568122
DOE Contract Number:
FC07-78ET27080
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geo-Heat Center Quarterly Bulletin; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 58 GEOSCIENCES; GEOTHERMAL DISTRICT HEATING; SOUTH DAKOTA; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; FLUID FLOW; GEOTHERMAL SPACE HEATING; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES