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Title: Air-storage systems

The air storage system, the critical component making CAES technically and economically feasible, is described in three of its forms. All have geological containments and reflect economics of scale requiring fairly large plant ratings and storage capacities. All three systems also are based on good precedent experience and there are a number of willing bidders in the engineering and construction field attesting to the readiness of the technology. The salient features of each storage system type are summarized. Hard rock caverns have the widest siting opportunity in a variety of geology, are well within construction capability in good quality rock with maximum control of system design through engineering, have the highest cost of the storage system options study and the potential for longest time to startup, are difficult and expensive to expand for increased storage or plant rating. The salt-solutioned cavern has limited siting opportunities, is a very economical storage system, and storage increase is possible through cavern additions.
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5561397
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-9438; CONF-811066-9
ON: DE82005805
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International energy storage conference, Seattle, WA, USA, 19 Oct 1981
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; COMPRESSED AIR; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; COMPRESSED AIR ENERGY STORAGE; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; ROCK CAVERNS; CONSTRUCTION; GEOLOGY; SALT CAVERNS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; STORAGE FACILITIES; AIR; CAVITIES; COMPRESSED GASES; ECONOMICS; ENERGY STORAGE; FLUIDS; GASES; STORAGE 250200* -- Energy Storage-- Compressed & Liquified Gas