skip to main content

SciTech ConnectSciTech Connect

Title: Substitution of chromium for univalent copper in superconducting Pb{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}(Ca, Y)Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8-{delta}}

Following considerations of geometry and the similarity between chromate and carbonate groups in terms of size and charge, the authors have investigated the possibility of replacing the two-coordinate Cu{sup I} in superconducting lead cuprates of the general formula Pb{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}(Ca, Y)Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8} by Cr. A high-resolution electron microscopy study coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis on small crystals of the title phases suggests that between 10 and 15% of the Cu{sup 1} can be replaced by Cr. While from the present structural study using HRTEM and Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder data the authors are unable to precisely obtain the oxidation state and oxygen coordination of Cr, the authors suggest in analogy with Cr substitution in other similar cuprates that in the title phases Cu{sup I}O{sub 2} rods are partially replaced by tetrahedral CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} groups. Infrared spectroscopy supports the presence of CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} groups. The phases Pb{sub 1.75}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.2}Y{sub 0.8}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8-{delta}} and Pb{sub 1.75}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.2}Y{sub 0.8}Cu{sub 2.85}Cr{sub 0.15}O{sub 8-{delta}} are superconducting as-prepared, but the substitution of Cr for Cu{sup I} results in a decrease of the T{sub C} as well as the superconducting volume fraction.
Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. ISMRA et Universite de Caen (France) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
555035
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 127; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: 15 Nov 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; LEAD COMPOUNDS; CRITICAL TEMPERATURE; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS; CUPRATES; OXIDATION; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; STOICHIOMETRY; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY