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Title: Hydrogen technologies

To the non-nonsense engineer, any talk of a hydrogen economy may seem like so much hot air. This paper reports that as legislative, safety and environmental issues continue to tighten, they're promoting hydrogen's chances as an energy source and, more immediately, its prospects as a chemical feedstock. Paradoxically, the environmental demands that are stimulating hydrogen demand are also inhibiting the gas's production. Previously, gasoline was made with benzene, which means that H{sub 2} was rejected. But now that the laws mandate lower aromatic and higher oxygenate levels in gasolines, there's less H{sub 2} available as byproduct. At the same time, H{sub 2} demand is rising in hydrodesulfurization units, since the same laws require refiners to cut sulfur levels in fuels. Supplementary sources for the gas are also shrinking. In the chlor-alkali industry, H{sub 2} output is dropping, as demand for its coproduct chlorine weakens. At the same time, H{sub 2} demand for the making of hydrogen peroxide is growing, as that environmentally safer bleach gains chlorine's market share.
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5045767
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemical Engineering (New York); (United States); Journal Volume: 99:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; ENERGY SOURCES; HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN FUELS; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; AIR POLLUTION; CHEMICAL FEEDSTOCKS; DEMAND; GASOLINE; HYDROGEN PEROXIDE; PETROLEUM REFINERIES; US CLEAN AIR ACT; ELEMENTS; FUELS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; LAWS; LIQUID FUELS; MATERIALS; NONMETALS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PEROXIDES; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; POLLUTION; POLLUTION LAWS; RAW MATERIALS; SYNTHETIC FUELS 080400* -- Hydrogen-- Economic, Industrial, & Business Aspects