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Title: A new perspective on hydrogen production by photosynthetic water-splitting

Present energy systems are heavily dependent on fossil fuels. This will eventually lead to the foreseeable depletion of fossil energy resources and, according to some reports, global climate changes due to the emission of carbon dioxide. In principle, hydrogen production by biophotolysis of water can be an ideal solar energy conversion system for sustainable development of human activities in harmony with the global environment. In photosynthetic hydrogen production research, there are currently two main efforts: (1) Direct photoevolution of hydrogen and oxygen by photosynthetic water splitting using the ferredoxin/hydrogenase pathway; (2) Dark hydrogen production by fermentation of organic reserves such as starch that are generated by photosynthesis during the light period. In this chapter, the advantages and challenges of the two approaches for hydrogen production will be discussed, in relation to a new opportunity brought by our recent discovery of a new photosynthetic water-splitting reaction which, potentially, has twice the energy efficiency of conventional watersplitting via the two light reaction Z-scheme of photosynthesis.
Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
236273
Report Number(s):
CONF-960376--14
ON: DE96010569; TRN: 96:003306
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Spring national meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), New Orleans, LA (United States), 24-28 Mar 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN FUEL; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; BIOPHOTOLYSIS; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; STARCH; BIOCONVERSION; CARBON DIOXIDE; EFFICIENCY; FERMENTATION; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION