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Title: ESTIMATION OF DISTANCES TO STARS WITH STELLAR PARAMETERS FROM LAMOST

We present a method to estimate distances to stars with spectroscopically derived stellar parameters. The technique is a Bayesian approach with likelihood estimated via comparison of measured parameters to a grid of stellar isochrones, and returns a posterior probability density function for each star’s absolute magnitude. This technique is tailored specifically to data from the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey. Because LAMOST obtains roughly 3000 stellar spectra simultaneously within each ∼5° diameter “plate” that is observed, we can use the stellar parameters of the observed stars to account for the stellar luminosity function and target selection effects. This removes biasing assumptions about the underlying populations, both due to predictions of the luminosity function from stellar evolution modeling, and from Galactic models of stellar populations along each line of sight. Using calibration data of stars with known distances and stellar parameters, we show that our method recovers distances for most stars within ∼20%, but with some systematic overestimation of distances to halo giants. We apply our code to the LAMOST database, and show that the current precision of LAMOST stellar parameters permits measurements of distances with ∼40% error bars. This precision should improve as the LAMOST datamore » pipelines continue to be refined.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ; ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9]
  1. Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)
  2. Key Lab of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)
  3. Department of Physics and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)
  4. Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)
  5. UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  6. Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210042 (China)
  7. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Suite 605, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)
  8. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, UT 84112 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22520210
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 150; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CALIBRATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DISTANCE; EMISSION SPECTRA; EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY; GALAXIES; LUMINOSITY; PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTIONS; STAR EVOLUTION; STARS; TELESCOPES