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Title: THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEY OF THE ORION A AND B MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF DUSTY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc{sup −2} to over 10,000 pc{sup −2}, with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities ≥10 pc{sup −2}, we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups shows that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/ormore » highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only ∼2 Myr in age. We find that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ; ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10]
  1. Ritter Astrophsical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)
  2. Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)
  3. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  4. Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  5. National Optical Astronomical Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)
  6. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  7. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
  8. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester NY 14627 (United States)
  9. Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  10. SOFIA-Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22520039
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 151; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASYMMETRY; COSMIC DUST; COSMIC X-RAY SOURCES; DENSITY; EFFICIENCY; NEBULAE; PROTOSTARS; SPACE; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; STAR CLUSTERS; STARS; SURFACES; TELESCOPES; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION