skip to main content

Title: CSI 2264: CHARACTERIZING YOUNG STARS IN NGC 2264 WITH STOCHASTICALLY VARYING LIGHT CURVES

We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves and other supporting data for 17 classical T Tauri stars in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves exemplify the “stochastic” light curve class as defined in 2014 by Cody et al. The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability within this light curve class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. Where we have appropriate spectral data, we show that the veiling variability in these stars is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical light curve morphology. The veiling variability is also well-correlated with the strength of the He i 6678 Å emission line, predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst light curve morphology also have variable mass accretion. The stochastic and accretion burst light curves can both be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic light curve class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Members of the stochastic light curve class have only moderate mass accretion rates. Their Hα profiles usually have blueshifted absorption features, probably originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signaturesmore » in the light curves suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.« less
Authors:
; ;  [1] ;  [2] ; ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ; ; ;  [7] ; ;  [8] ; ;  [9] ; ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] more »; « less
  1. Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  2. NASA Ames Research Center, Kepler Science Office, Mountain View, CA 94035 (United States)
  3. Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  4. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
  5. Department of Physics and Astronomy, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States)
  6. Centro de Astrobiología, Dpto. de Astrofísica, INTA-CSIC, P.O. BOX 78, E-28691, ESAC Campus, Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain)
  7. Departamento de Física—ICEx—UFMG, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, 30270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)
  8. Université de Grenoble, Institut de Planétologie et d’Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), F-38000 Grenoble (France)
  9. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI:48105 (United States)
  10. INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134, Palermo (Italy)
  11. Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)
  12. Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22520001
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 151; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DIAGRAMS; HOT SPOTS; MASS; MORPHOLOGY; PERIODICITY; PHOTOSPHERE; PROTOSTARS; RANDOMNESS; STAR ACCRETION; STOCHASTIC PROCESSES; T TAURI STARS; TIME DEPENDENCE; TRANSIENTS; VISIBLE RADIATION